Animate Images and Videos with curtains.js

While browsing the latest award-winning websites, you may notice a lot of fancy image distortion animations or neat 3D effects. Most of them are created with WebGL, an API allowing GPU-accelerated image processing effects and animations. They also tend to use libraries built on top of WebGL such as three.js or pixi.js. Both are very powerful tools to create respectively 2D and 3D scenes.

But, you should keep in mind that those libraries were not originally designed to create slideshows or animate DOM elements. There is a library designed just for that, though, and we’re going to cover how to use it here in this post.

WebGL, CSS Positioning, and Responsiveness

Say you’re working with a library like three.js or pixi.js and you want to use it to create interactions, like mouseover and scroll events on elements. You might run into trouble! How do you position your WebGL elements relative to the document and other DOM elements? How would handle responsiveness?

This is exactly what I had in mind when creating curtains.js.

Curatins.js allows you to create planes containing images and videos (in WebGL we will call them textures) that act like plain HTML elements, with position and size defined by CSS rules. But these planes can be enhanced with the endless possibilities of WebGL and shaders.

Wait, shaders?

Shaders are small programs written in GLSL that will tell your The Book of Shaders.

Now that you get the idea, let’s create our first plane!

Setup of a basic plane

To display our first plane, we will need a bit of HTML, CSS, and some JavaScript to create the plane. Then our shaders will animate it.

HTML

The HTML will be really simple here. We will create a <div> that will hold our canvas, and a div that will hold our image.

<body> <!-- div that will hold our WebGL canvas --> <div id="canvas"></div> <!-- div used to create our plane --> <div class="plane"> <!-- image that will be used as a texture by our plane --> <img src="path/to/my-image.jpg" /> </div> </body>

CSS

We will will use CSS to make sure the <div> that wraps the canvas will be bigger than our plane, and apply any size to the plane div. (Our WebGL plane will have the exact same size and positions of this div.)

body { /* make the body fit our viewport */ position: relative; width: 100%; height: 100vh; margin: 0; /* hide scrollbars */ overflow: hidden;
} #canvas { /* make the canvas wrapper fit the document */ position: absolute; top: 0; right: 0; bottom: 0; left: 0;
}
.plane { /* define the size of your plane */ width: 80%; max-width: 1400px; height: 80vh; position: relative; top: 10vh; margin: 0 auto;
} .plane img { /* hide the img element */ display: none;
}

JavaScript

There’s a bit more work in the JavaScript. We need to instantiate our WebGL context, create a plane with uniform parameters, and use it.

window.onload = function() { // pass the id of the div that will wrap the canvas to set up our WebGL context and append the canvas to our wrapper var webGLCurtain = new Curtains("canvas"); // get our plane element var planeElement = document.getElementsByClassName("plane")[0]; // set our initial parameters (basic uniforms) var params = { vertexShaderID: "plane-vs", // our vertex shader ID fragmentShaderID: "plane-fs", // our framgent shader ID uniforms: { time: { name: "uTime", // uniform name that will be passed to our shaders type: "1f", // this means our uniform is a float value: 0, }, } } // create our plane mesh var plane = webGLCurtain.addPlane(planeElement, params); // use the onRender method of our plane fired at each requestAnimationFrame call plane.onRender(function() { plane.uniforms.time.value++; // update our time uniform value }); }

Shaders

We need to write the vertex shader. It won’t be doing much except position our plane based on the model view and projection matrix and pass varyings to the fragment shader:

<!-- vertex shader -->
<script id="plane-vs" type="x-shader/x-vertex"> #ifdef GL_ES precision mediump float; #endif // those are the mandatory attributes that the lib sets attribute vec3 aVertexPosition; attribute vec2 aTextureCoord; // those are mandatory uniforms that the lib sets and that contain our model view and projection matrix uniform mat4 uMVMatrix; uniform mat4 uPMatrix; // if you want to pass your vertex and texture coords to the fragment shader varying vec3 vVertexPosition; varying vec2 vTextureCoord; void main() { // get the vertex position from its attribute vec3 vertexPosition = aVertexPosition; // set its position based on projection and model view matrix gl_Position = uPMatrix * uMVMatrix * vec4(vertexPosition, 1.0); // set the varyings vTextureCoord = aTextureCoord; vVertexPosition = vertexPosition; }
</script>

Now our fragment shader. This is where we will add a little displacement effect based on our time uniform and the texture coordinates.

<!-- fragment shader -->
<script id="plane-fs" type="x-shader/x-fragment"> #ifdef GL_ES precision mediump float; #endif // get our varyings varying vec3 vVertexPosition; varying vec2 vTextureCoord; // the uniform we declared inside our javascript uniform float uTime; // our texture sampler (this is the lib default name, but it could be changed) uniform sampler2D uSampler0; void main() { // get our texture coords vec2 textureCoord = vTextureCoord; // displace our pixels along both axis based on our time uniform and texture UVs // this will create a kind of water surface effect // try to comment a line or change the constants to see how it changes the effect // reminder : textures coords are ranging from 0.0 to 1.0 on both axis const float PI = 3.141592; textureCoord.x += ( sin(textureCoord.x * 10.0 + ((uTime * (PI / 3.0)) * 0.031)) + sin(textureCoord.y * 10.0 + ((uTime * (PI / 2.489)) * 0.017)) ) * 0.0075; textureCoord.y += ( sin(textureCoord.y * 20.0 + ((uTime * (PI / 2.023)) * 0.023)) + sin(textureCoord.x * 20.0 + ((uTime * (PI / 3.1254)) * 0.037)) ) * 0.0125; gl_FragColor = texture2D(uSampler0, textureCoord); }
</script>

Et voilà! You’re all done, and if everything went well, you should be seeing something like this.

See the Pen curtains.js basic plane by Martin Laxenaire (@martinlaxenaire) on CodePen.

Adding 3D and interactions

Alright, that’s pretty cool so far, but we started this post talking about 3D and interactions, so let’s look at how we could add those in.

About vertices

To add a 3D effect we would have to change the plane vertices position inside the vertex shader. However in our first example, we did not specify how many vertices our plane should have, so it was created with a default geometry containing six vertices forming two triangles :

In order to get decent 3D animations, we would need more triangles, thus more vertices:

This plane has five segments along its width and five segments along its height. As a result, we have 50 triangles and 150 total vertices.

Refactoring our JavaScript

Fortunately, it is easy to specify our plane definition as it could be set inside our initial parameters.

We are also going to listen to mouse position to add a bit of interaction. To do it properly, we will have to wait for the plane to be ready, convert our mouse document coordinates to our WebGL clip space coordinates and send them to the shaders as a uniform.

// we are using window onload event here but this is not mandatory
window.onload = function() { // track the mouse positions to send it to the shaders var mousePosition = { x: 0, y: 0, }; // pass the id of the div that will wrap the canvas to set up our WebGL context and append the canvas to our wrapper var webGLCurtain = new Curtains("canvas"); // get our plane element var planeElement = document.getElementsByClassName("plane")[0]; // set our initial parameters (basic uniforms) var params = { vertexShaderID: "plane-vs", // our vertex shader ID fragmentShaderID: "plane-fs", // our framgent shader ID widthSegments: 20, heightSegments: 20, // we now have 20*20*6 = 2400 vertices ! uniforms: { time: { name: "uTime", // uniform name that will be passed to our shaders type: "1f", // this means our uniform is a float value: 0, }, mousePosition: { // our mouse position name: "uMousePosition", type: "2f", // notice this is a length 2 array of floats value: [mousePosition.x, mousePosition.y], }, mouseStrength: { // the strength of the effect (we will attenuate it if the mouse stops moving) name: "uMouseStrength", // uniform name that will be passed to our shaders type: "1f", // this means our uniform is a float value: 0, }, } } // create our plane mesh var plane = webGLCurtain.addPlane(planeElement, params); // once our plane is ready, we could start listening to mouse/touch events and update its uniforms plane.onReady(function() { // set a field of view of 35 to exagerate perspective // we could have done it directly in the initial params plane.setPerspective(35); // listen our mouse/touch events on the whole document // we will pass the plane as second argument of our function // we could be handling multiple planes that way document.body.addEventListener("mousemove", function(e) { handleMovement(e, plane); }); document.body.addEventListener("touchmove", function(e) { handleMovement(e, plane); }); }).onRender(function() { // update our time uniform value plane.uniforms.time.value++; // continually decrease mouse strength plane.uniforms.mouseStrength.value = Math.max(0, plane.uniforms.mouseStrength.value - 0.0075); }); // handle the mouse move event function handleMovement(e, plane) { // touch event if(e.targetTouches) { mousePosition.x = e.targetTouches[0].clientX; mousePosition.y = e.targetTouches[0].clientY; } // mouse event else { mousePosition.x = e.clientX; mousePosition.y = e.clientY; } // convert our mouse/touch position to coordinates relative to the vertices of the plane var mouseCoords = plane.mouseToPlaneCoords(mousePosition.x, mousePosition.y); // update our mouse position uniform plane.uniforms.mousePosition.value = [mouseCoords.x, mouseCoords.y]; // reassign mouse strength plane.uniforms.mouseStrength.value = 1; } }

Now that our JavaScript is done, we have to rewrite our shaders so that they’ll use our mouse position uniform.

Refactoring the shaders

Let’s look at our vertex shader first. We have three uniforms that we could use for our effect:

  1. the time which is constantly increasing
  2. the mouse position
  3. our mouse strength, which is constantly decreasing until the next mouse move

We will use all three of them to create a kind of 3D ripple effect.

<script id="plane-vs" type="x-shader/x-vertex"> #ifdef GL_ES precision mediump float; #endif // those are the mandatory attributes that the lib sets attribute vec3 aVertexPosition; attribute vec2 aTextureCoord; // those are mandatory uniforms that the lib sets and that contain our model view and projection matrix uniform mat4 uMVMatrix; uniform mat4 uPMatrix; // our time uniform uniform float uTime; // our mouse position uniform uniform vec2 uMousePosition; // our mouse strength uniform float uMouseStrength; // if you want to pass your vertex and texture coords to the fragment shader varying vec3 vVertexPosition; varying vec2 vTextureCoord; void main() { vec3 vertexPosition = aVertexPosition; // get the distance between our vertex and the mouse position float distanceFromMouse = distance(uMousePosition, vec2(vertexPosition.x, vertexPosition.y)); // this will define how close the ripples will be from each other. The bigger the number, the more ripples you'll get float rippleFactor = 6.0; // calculate our ripple effect float rippleEffect = cos(rippleFactor * (distanceFromMouse - (uTime / 120.0))); // calculate our distortion effect float distortionEffect = rippleEffect * uMouseStrength; // apply it to our vertex position vertexPosition += distortionEffect / 15.0; gl_Position = uPMatrix * uMVMatrix * vec4(vertexPosition, 1.0); // varyings vTextureCoord = aTextureCoord; vVertexPosition = vertexPosition; }
</script>

As for the fragment shader, we are going to keep it simple. We are going to fake lights and shadows based on each vertex position:

<script id="plane-fs" type="x-shader/x-fragment"> #ifdef GL_ES precision mediump float; #endif // get our varyings varying vec3 vVertexPosition; varying vec2 vTextureCoord; // our texture sampler (this is the lib default name, but it could be changed) uniform sampler2D uSampler0; void main() { // get our texture coords vec2 textureCoords = vTextureCoord; // apply our texture vec4 finalColor = texture2D(uSampler0, textureCoords); // fake shadows based on vertex position along Z axis finalColor.rgb -= clamp(-vVertexPosition.z, 0.0, 1.0); // fake lights based on vertex position along Z axis finalColor.rgb += clamp(vVertexPosition.z, 0.0, 1.0); // handling premultiplied alpha (useful if we were using a png with transparency) finalColor = vec4(finalColor.rgb * finalColor.a, finalColor.a); gl_FragColor = finalColor; }
</script>

And there you go!

See the Pen curtains.js ripple effect example by Martin Laxenaire (@martinlaxenaire) on CodePen.

With these two simple examples, we’ve seen how to create a plane and interact with it.

Videos and displacement shaders

Our last example will create a basic fullscreen video slideshow using a displacement shader to enhance the transitions.

Displacement shader concept

The displacement shader will create a nice distortion effect. It will be written inside our fragment shader using a grayscale picture and will offset the pixel coordinates of the videos based on the texture RGB values. Here’s the image we will be using:

The effect will be calculated based on each pixel RGB value, with a black pixel being [0, 0, 0] and a white pixel [1, 1, 1] (GLSL equivalent for [255, 255, 255]). To simplify, we will use only the red channel value, as with a grayscale image red, green and blue are always equal.

You can try to create your own grayscale image (it works great with geometric shape ) to get your unique transition effect.

Multiple textures and videos

A plane can have more than one texture simply by adding multiple image tags. This time, instead of images we want to use videos. We just have to replace the <img /> tags with a <video /> one. However there are two things to know when it comes to video:

  • The video will always fit the exact size of the plane, which means your plane has to have the same width/height ratio as your video. This is not a big deal tho because it is easy to handle with CSS.
  • On mobile devices, we can’t autoplay videos without a user gesture, like a click event. It is therefore safer to add a “enter site” button to display and launch our videos.

HTML

The HTML is still pretty straightforward. We will create our canvas div wrapper, our plane div containing the textures and a button to trigger the video autoplay. Just notice the use of the data-sampler attribute on the image and video tags—it will be useful inside our fragment shader.

<body> <div id="canvas"></div> <!-- this div will handle the fullscreen video sizes and positions --> <div class="plane-wrapper"> <div class="plane"> <!-- notice here we are using the data-sampler attribute to name our sampler uniforms --> <img src="path/to/displacement.jpg" data-sampler="displacement" /> <video src="path/to/video.mp4" data-sampler="firstTexture"></video> <video src="path/to/video-2.mp4" data-sampler="secondTexture"></video> </div> </div> <div id="enter-site-wrapper"> <span id="enter-site"> Click to enter site </span> </div>
</body>

CSS

The stylesheet will handle a few things: display the button and hide the canvas before the user has entered the site, size and position our plane-wrapper div to handle fullscreen responsive videos.

@media screen { body { margin: 0; font-size: 18px; font-family: 'PT Sans', Verdana, sans-serif; background: #212121; line-height: 1.4; height: 100vh; width: 100vw; overflow: hidden; } /*** canvas ***/ #canvas { position: absolute; top: 0; right: 0; bottom: 0; left: 0; z-index: 10; /* hide the canvas until the user clicks the button */ opacity: 0; transition: opacity 0.5s ease-in; } /* display the canvas */ .video-started #canvas { opacity: 1; } .plane-wrapper { position: absolute; /* center our plane wrapper */ left: 50%; top: 50%; transform: translate(-50%, -50%); z-index: 15; } .plane { position: absolute; top: 0; right: 0; bottom: 0; left: 0; /* tell the user he can click the plane */ cursor: pointer; } /* hide the original image and videos */ .plane img, .plane video { display: none; } /* center the button */ #enter-site-wrapper { display: flex; justify-content: center; align-items: center; align-content: center; position: absolute; top: 0; right: 0; bottom: 0; left: 0; z-index: 30; /* hide the button until everything is ready */ opacity: 0; transition: opacity 0.5s ease-in; } /* show the button */ .curtains-ready #enter-site-wrapper { opacity: 1; } /* hide the button after the click event */ .curtains-ready.video-started #enter-site-wrapper { opacity: 0; pointer-events: none; } #enter-site { padding: 20px; color: white; background: #ee6557; max-width: 200px; text-align: center; cursor: pointer; } } /* fullscreen video responsive */
@media screen and (max-aspect-ratio: 1920/1080) { .plane-wrapper { height: 100vh; width: 177vh; }
} @media screen and (min-aspect-ratio: 1920/1080) { .plane-wrapper { width: 100vw; height: 56.25vw; }
}

JavaScript

As for the JavaScript, we will go like this:

  • Set a couple variables to store our slideshow state
  • Create the Curtains object and add the plane to it
  • When the plane is ready, listen to a click event to start our videos playback (notice the use of the playVideos() method). Add another click event to switch between the two videos.
  • Update our transition timer uniform inside the onRender() method
window.onload = function() { // here we will handle which texture is visible and the timer to transition between images var activeTexture = 1; var transitionTimer = 0; // set up our WebGL context and append the canvas to our wrapper var webGLCurtain = new Curtains("canvas"); // get our plane element var planeElements = document.getElementsByClassName("plane"); // some basic parameters var params = { vertexShaderID: "plane-vs", fragmentShaderID: "plane-fs", imageCover: false, // our displacement texture has to fit the plane uniforms: { transitionTimer: { name: "uTransitionTimer", type: "1f", value: 0, }, }, } var plane = webGLCurtain.addPlane(planeElements[0], params); // create our plane plane.onReady(function() { // display the button document.body.classList.add("curtains-ready"); // when our plane is ready we add a click event listener that will switch the active texture value planeElements[0].addEventListener("click", function() { if(activeTexture == 1) { activeTexture = 2; } else { activeTexture = 1; } }); // click to play the videos document.getElementById("enter-site").addEventListener("click", function() { // display canvas and hide the button document.body.classList.add("video-started"); // play our videos plane.playVideos(); }, false); }).onRender(function() { // increase or decrease our timer based on the active texture value // at 60fps this should last one second if(activeTexture == 2) { transitionTimer = Math.min(60, transitionTimer + 1); } else { transitionTimer = Math.max(0, transitionTimer - 1); } // update our transition timer uniform plane.uniforms.transitionTimer.value = transitionTimer; });
}

Shaders

This is where all the magic will occur. Like in our first example, the vertex shader won’t do much and you’ll have to focus on the fragment shader that will create a “dive in” effect:

<script id="plane-vs" type="x-shader/x-vertex"> #ifdef GL_ES precision mediump float; #endif // default mandatory variables attribute vec3 aVertexPosition; attribute vec2 aTextureCoord; uniform mat4 uMVMatrix; uniform mat4 uPMatrix; // varyings varying vec3 vVertexPosition; varying vec2 vTextureCoord; // custom uniforms uniform float uTransitionTimer; void main() { vec3 vertexPosition = aVertexPosition; gl_Position = uPMatrix * uMVMatrix * vec4(vertexPosition, 1.0); // varyings vTextureCoord = aTextureCoord; vVertexPosition = vertexPosition; }
</script> <script id="plane-fs" type="x-shader/x-fragment"> #ifdef GL_ES precision mediump float; #endif varying vec3 vVertexPosition; varying vec2 vTextureCoord; // custom uniforms uniform float uTransitionTimer; // our textures samplers // notice how it matches our data-sampler attributes uniform sampler2D firstTexture; uniform sampler2D secondTexture; uniform sampler2D displacement; void main( void ) { // our texture coords vec2 textureCoords = vec2(vTextureCoord.x, vTextureCoord.y); // our displacement texture vec4 displacementTexture = texture2D(displacement, textureCoords); // our displacement factor is a float varying from 1 to 0 based on the timer float displacementFactor = 1.0 - (cos(uTransitionTimer / (60.0 / 3.141592)) + 1.0) / 2.0; // the effect factor will tell which way we want to displace our pixels // the farther from the center of the videos, the stronger it will be vec2 effectFactor = vec2((textureCoords.x - 0.5) * 0.75, (textureCoords.y - 0.5) * 0.75); // calculate our displaced coordinates to our first video vec2 firstDisplacementCoords = vec2(textureCoords.x - displacementFactor * (displacementTexture.r * effectFactor.x), textureCoords.y - displacementFactor * (displacementTexture.r * effectFactor.y)); // opposite displacement effect on the second video vec2 secondDisplacementCoords = vec2(textureCoords.x - (1.0 - displacementFactor) * (displacementTexture.r * effectFactor.x), textureCoords.y - (1.0 - displacementFactor) * (displacementTexture.r * effectFactor.y)); // apply the textures vec4 firstDistortedColor = texture2D(firstTexture, firstDisplacementCoords); vec4 secondDistortedColor = texture2D(secondTexture, secondDisplacementCoords); // blend both textures based on our displacement factor vec4 finalColor = mix(firstDistortedColor, secondDistortedColor, displacementFactor); // handling premultiplied alpha finalColor = vec4(finalColor.rgb * finalColor.a, finalColor.a); // apply our shader gl_FragColor = finalColor; }
</script>

Here’s our little video slideshow with a cool transition effect:

See the Pen curtains.js video slideshow by Martin Laxenaire (@martinlaxenaire) on CodePen.

This example is a great way to show you how to create a slideshow with curtains.js: you might want to use images instead of videos, change the displacement texture, modify the fragment shader or even add more slides…

Going deeper

We’ve just scraped the surface of what’s possible with curtains.js. You could try to create multiple planes with a cool mouse over effect for your article thumbs for example. The possibilities are almost endless.

If you want to see more examples covering all those basics usages, you can check the library website or the GitHub repo.

The post Animate Images and Videos with curtains.js appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

Simple Swipe With Vanilla JavaScript

I used to think implementing swipe gestures had to be very difficult, but I have recently found myself in a situation where I had to do it and discovered the reality is nowhere near as gloomy as I had imagined.

This article is going to take you, step by step, through the implementation with the least amount of code I could come up with. So, let’s jump right into it!

The HTML Structure

We start off with a .container that has a bunch of images inside:

<div class='container'> <img src='img1.jpg' alt='image description'/> ...
</div>

Basic Styles

We use display: flex to make sure images go alongside each other with no spaces in between. align-items: center middle aligns them vertically. We make both the images and the container take the width of the container’s parent (the body in our case).

.container { display: flex; align-items: center; width: 100%; img { min-width: 100%; /* needed so Firefox doesn't make img shrink to fit */ width: 100%; /* can't take this out either as it breaks Chrome */ }
}

The fact that both the .container and its child images have the same width makes these images spill out on the right side (as highlighted by the red outline) creating a horizontal scrollbar, but this is precisely what we want:

Screenshot showing this very basic layout with the container and the images having the same width as the body and the images spilling out of the container to the right, creating a horizontal scrollbar on the body.
The initial layout (see live demo).

Given that not all the images have the same dimensions and aspect ratio, we have a bit of white space above and below some of them. So, we’re going to trim that by giving the .container an explicit height that should pretty much work for the average aspect ratio of these images and setting overflow-y to hidden:

.container { /* same as before */ overflow-y: hidden; height: 50vw; max-height: 100vh;
}

The result can be seen below, with all the images trimmed to the same height and no empty spaces anymore:

Screenshot showing the result after limiting the container's height and trimming everything that doesn't fit vertically with overflow-y. This means we now have a horizontal scrollbar on the container itself.
The result after images are trimmed by overflow-y on the .container (see live demo).

Alright, but now we have a horizontal scrollbar on the .container itself. Well, that’s actually a good thing for the no JavaScript case.

Otherwise, we create a CSS variable --n for the number of images and we use this to make .container wide enough to hold all its image children that still have the same width as its parent (the body in this case):

.container { --n: 1; width: 100%; width: calc(var(--n)*100%); img { min-width: 100%; width: 100%; width: calc(100%/var(--n)); }
}

Note that we keep the previous width declarations as fallbacks. The calc() values won’t change a thing until we set --n from the JavaScript after getting our .container and the number of child images it holds:

const _C = document.querySelector('.container'), N = _C.children.length; _C.style.setProperty('--n', N)

Now our .container has expanded to fit all the images inside:

Layout with expanded container (live demo).

Switching Images

Next, we get rid of the horizontal scrollbar by setting overflow-x: hidden on our container’s parent (the body in our case) and we create another CSS variable that holds the index of the currently selected image (--i). We use this to properly position the .container with respect to the viewport via a translation (remember that % values inside translate() functions are relative to the dimensions of the element we have set this transform on):

body { overflow-x: hidden } .container { /* same styles as before */ transform: translate(calc(var(--i, 0)/var(--n)*-100%));
}

Changing the --i to a different integer value greater or equal to zero, but smaller than --n, brings another image into view, as illustrated by the interactive demo below (where the value of --i is controlled by a range input):

See the Pen by thebabydino (@thebabydino) on CodePen.

Alright, but we don’t want to use a slider to do this.

The basic idea is that we’re going to detect the direction of the motion between the "touchstart" (or "mousedown") event and the "touchend" (or "mouseup") and then update --i accordingly to move the container such that the next image (if there is one) in the desired direction moves into the viewport.

function lock(e) {}; function move(e) {}; _C.addEventListener('mousedown', lock, false);
_C.addEventListener('touchstart', lock, false); _C.addEventListener('mouseup', move, false);
_C.addEventListener('touchend', move, false);

Note that this will only work for the mouse if we set pointer-events: none on the images.

.container { /* same styles as before */ img { /* same styles as before */ pointer-events: none; }
}

Also, Edge needs to have touch events enabled from about:flags as this option is off by default:

Screenshot showing the 'Enable touch events' option being set to 'Only when a touchscreen is detected' in about:flags in Edge.
Enabling touch events in Edge.

Before we populate the lock() and move() functions, we unify the touch and click cases:

function unify(e) { return e.changedTouches ? e.changedTouches[0] : e };

Locking on "touchstart" (or "mousedown") means getting and storing the x coordinate into an initial coordinate variable x0:

let x0 = null; function lock(e) { x0 = unify(e).clientX };

In order to see how to move our .container (or if we even do that because we don’t want to move further when we have reached the end), we check if we have performed the lock() action, and if we have, we read the current x coordinate, compute the difference between it and x0 and resolve what to do out of its sign and the current index:

let i = 0; function move(e) { if(x0 || x0 === 0) { let dx = unify(e).clientX - x0, s = Math.sign(dx); if((i > 0 || s < 0) && (i < N - 1 || s > 0)) _C.style.setProperty('--i', i -= s); x0 = null }
};

The result on dragging left/ right can be seen below:

Animated gif. Shows how we switch to the next image by dragging left/ right if there is a next image in the direction we want to go. Attempts to move to the right on the first image or left on the last one do nothing as we have no other image before or after, respectively.
Switching between images on swipe (live demo). Attempts to move to the right on the first image or left on the last one do nothing as we have no other image before or after, respectively.

The above is the expected result and the result we get in Chrome for a little bit of drag and Firefox. However, Edge navigates backward and forward when we drag left or right, which is something that Chrome also does on a bit more drag.

Animated gif. Shows how Edge navigates the pageview backward and forward when we swipe left or right.
Edge navigating the pageview backward or forward on left or right swipe.

In order to override this, we need to add a "touchmove" event listener:

_C.addEventListener('touchmove', e => {e.preventDefault()}, false)

Alright, we now have something functional in all browsers, but it doesn’t look like what we’re really after… yet!

Smooth Motion

The easiest way to move towards getting what we want is by adding a transition:

.container { /* same styles as before */ transition: transform .5s ease-out;
}

And here it is, a very basic swipe effect in about 25 lines of JavaScript and about 25 lines of CSS:

Working swipe effect (live demo).

Sadly, there’s an Edge bug that makes any transition to a CSS variable-depending calc() translation fail. Ugh, I guess we have to forget about Edge for now.

Refining the Whole Thing

With all the cool swipe effects out there, what we have so far doesn’t quite cut it, so let’s see what improvements can be made.

Better Visual Cues While Dragging

First off, nothing happens while we drag, all the action follows the "touchend" (or "mouseup") event. So, while we drag, we have no indication of what’s going to happen next. Is there a next image to switch to in the desired direction? Or have we reached the end of the line and nothing will happen?

To take care of that, we tweak the translation amount a bit by adding a CSS variable --tx that’s originally 0px:

transform: translate(calc(var(--i, 0)/var(--n)*-100% + var(--tx, 0px)))

We use two more event listeners: one for "touchmove" and another for "mousemove". Note that we were already preventing backward and forward navigation in Chrome using the "touchmove" listener:

function drag(e) { e.preventDefault() }; _C.addEventListener('mousemove', drag, false);
_C.addEventListener('touchmove', drag, false);

Now let’s populate the drag() function! If we have performed the lock() action, we read the current x coordinate, compute the difference dx between this coordinate and the initial one x0 and set --tx to this value (which is a pixel value).

function drag(e) { e.preventDefault(); if(x0 || x0 === 0) _C.style.setProperty('--tx', `${Math.round(unify(e).clientX - x0)}px`)
};

We also need to make sure to reset --tx to 0px at the end and remove the transition for the duration of the drag. In order to make this easier, we move the transition declaration on a .smooth class:

.smooth { transition: transform .5s ease-out; }

In the lock() function, we remove this class from the .container (we’ll add it again at the end on "touchend" and "mouseup") and also set a locked boolean variable, so we don’t have to keep performing the x0 || x0 === 0 check. We then use the locked variable for the checks instead:

let locked = false; function lock(e) { x0 = unify(e).clientX; _C.classList.toggle('smooth', !(locked = true))
}; function drag(e) { e.preventDefault(); if(locked) { /* same as before */ }
}; function move(e) { if(locked) { let dx = unify(e).clientX - x0, s = Math.sign(dx); if((i > 0 || s < 0) && (i < N - 1 || s > 0)) _C.style.setProperty('--i', i -= s); _C.style.setProperty('--tx', '0px'); _C.classList.toggle('smooth', !(locked = false)); x0 = null }
};

The result can be seen below. While we’re still dragging, we now have a visual indication of what’s going to happen next:

Swipe with visual cues while dragging (live demo).

Fix the transition-duration

At this point, we’re always using the same transition-duration no matter how much of an image’s width we still have to translate after the drag. We can fix that in a pretty straightforward manner by introducing a factor f, which we also set as a CSS variable to help us compute the actual animation duration:

.smooth { transition: transform calc(var(--f, 1)*.5s) ease-out; }

In the JavaScript, we get an image’s width (updated on "resize") and compute for what fraction of this we have dragged horizontally:

let w; function size() { w = window.innerWidth }; function move(e) { if(locked) { let dx = unify(e).clientX - x0, s = Math.sign(dx), f = +(s*dx/w).toFixed(2); if((i > 0 || s < 0) && (i < N - 1 || s > 0)) { _C.style.setProperty('--i', i -= s); f = 1 - f } _C.style.setProperty('--tx', '0px'); _C.style.setProperty('--f', f); _C.classList.toggle('smooth', !(locked = false)); x0 = null }
}; size(); addEventListener('resize', size, false);

This now gives us a better result.

Go back if insufficient drag

Let’s say that we don’t want to move on to the next image if we only drag a little bit below a certain threshold. Because now, a 1px difference during the drag means we advance to the next image and that feels a bit unnatural.

To fix this, we set a threshold at let’s say 20% of an image’s width:

function move(e) { if(locked) { let dx = unify(e).clientX - x0, s = Math.sign(dx), f = +(s*dx/w).toFixed(2); if((i > 0 || s < 0) && (i < N - 1 || s > 0) && f > .2) { /* same as before */ } /* same as before */ }
};

The result can be seen below:

We only advance to the next image if we drag enough (live demo).

Maybe Add a Bounce?

This is something that I’m not sure was a good idea, but I was itching to try anyway: change the timing function so that we introduce a bounce. After a bit of dragging the handles on cubic-bezier.com, I came up with a result that seemed promising:

Animated gif. Shows the graphical representation of the cubic Bézier curve, with start point at (0, 0), end point at (1, 1) and control points at (1, 1.59) and (.61, .74), the progression on the [0, 1] interval being a function of time in the [0, 1] interval. Also illustrates how the transition function given by this cubic Bézier curve looks when applied on a translation compared to a plain ease-out.
What our chosen cubic Bézier timing function looks like compared to a plain ease-out.
transition: transform calc(var(--f)*.5s) cubic-bezier(1, 1.59, .61, .74);
Using a custom CSS timing function to introduce a bounce (live demo).

How About the JavaScript Way, Then?

We could achieve a better degree of control over more natural-feeling and more complex bounces by taking the JavaScript route for the transition. This would also give us Edge support.

We start by getting rid of the transition and the --tx and --f CSS variables. This reduces our transform to what it was initially:

transform: translate(calc(var(--i, 0)/var(--n)*-100%));

The above code also means --i won’t necessarily be an integer anymore. While it remains an integer while we have a single image fully into view, that’s not the case anymore while we drag or during the motion after triggering the "touchend" or "mouseup" events.

Annotated screenshots illustrating what images we see for --i: 0 (1st image), --i: 1 (2nd image), --i: .5 (half of 1st and half of 2nd) and --i: .75 (a quarter of 1st and three quarters of 2nd).
For example, while we have the first image fully in view, --i is 0. While we have the second one fully in view, --i is 1. When we’re midway between the first and the second, --i is .5. When we have a quarter of the first one and three quarters of the second one in view, --i is .75.

We then update the JavaScript to replace the code parts where we were updating these CSS variables. First, we take care of the lock() function, where we ditch toggling the .smooth class and of the drag() function, where we replace updating the --tx variable we’ve ditched with updating --i, which, as mentioned before, doesn’t need to be an integer anymore:

function lock(e) { x0 = unify(e).clientX; locked = true
}; function drag(e) { e.preventDefault(); if(locked) { let dx = unify(e).clientX - x0, f = +(dx/w).toFixed(2); _C.style.setProperty('--i', i - f) }
};

Before we also update the move() function, we introduce two new variables, ini and fin. These represent the initial value we set --i to at the beginning of the animation and the final value we set the same variable to at the end of the animation. We also create an animation function ani():

let ini, fin; function ani() {}; function move(e) { if(locked) { let dx = unify(e).clientX - x0, s = Math.sign(dx), f = +(s*dx/w).toFixed(2); ini = i - s*f; if((i > 0 || s < 0) && (i < N - 1 || s > 0) && f > .2) { i -= s; f = 1 - f } fin = i; ani(); x0 = null; locked = false; }
};

This is not too different from the code we had before. What has changed is that we’re not setting any CSS variables in this function anymore but instead set the ini and the fin JavaScript variables and call the animation ani() function.

ini is the initial value we set --i to at the beginning of the animation that the "touchend"/ "mouseup" event triggers. This is given by the current position we have when one of these two events fires.

fin is the final value we set --i to at the end of the same animation. This is always an integer value because we always end with one image fully into sight, so fin and --i are the index of that image. This is the next image in the desired direction if we dragged enough (f > .2) and if there is a next image in the desired direction ((i > 0 || s < 0) && (i < N - 1 || s > 0)). In this case, we also update the JavaScript variable storing the current image index (i) and the relative distance to it (f). Otherwise, it’s the same image, so i and f don’t need to get updated.

Now, let’s move on to the ani() function. We start with a simplified linear version that leaves out a change of direction.

const NF = 30; let rID = null; function stopAni() { cancelAnimationFrame(rID); rID = null
}; function ani(cf = 0) { _C.style.setProperty('--i', ini + (fin - ini)*cf/NF); if(cf === NF) { stopAni(); return } rID = requestAnimationFrame(ani.bind(this, ++cf))
};

The main idea here is that the transition between the initial value ini and the final one fin happens over a total number of frames NF. Every time we call the ani() function, we compute the progress as the ratio between the current frame index cf and the total number of frames NF. This is always a number between 0 and 1 (or you can take it as a percentage, going from 0% to 100%). We then use this progress value to get the current value of --i and set it in the style attribute of our container _C. If we got to the final state (the current frame index cf equals the total number of frames NF, we exit the animation loop). Otherwise, we just increment the current frame index cf and call ani() again.

At this point, we have a working demo with a linear JavaScript transition:

Version with linear JavaScript transition (live demo).

However, this has the problem we initially had in the CSS case: no matter the distance, we have to have to smoothly translate our element over on release ("touchend" / "mouseup") and the duration is always the same because we always animate over the same number of frames NF.

Let’s fix that!

In order to do so, we introduce another variable anf where we store the actual number of frames we use and whose value we compute in the move() function, before calling the animation function ani():

function move(e) { if(locked) { let dx = unify(e).clientX - x0, s = Math.sign(dx), f = +(s*dx/w).toFixed(2); /* same as before */ anf = Math.round(f*NF); ani(); /* same as before */ }
};

We also need to replace NF with anf in the animation function ani():

function ani(cf = 0) { _C.style.setProperty('--i', ini + (fin - ini)*cf/anf); if(cf === anf) { /* same as before */ } /* same as before */
};

With this, we have fixed the timing issue!

Version with linear JavaScript transition at constant speed (live demo).

Alright, but a linear timing function isn’t too exciting.

We could try the JavaScript equivalents of CSS timing functions such as ease-in, ease-out or ease-in-out and see how they compare. I’ve already explained in a lot of detail how to get these in the previously linked article, so I’m not going to go through that again and just drop the object with all of them into the code:

const TFN = { 'linear': function(k) { return k }, 'ease-in': function(k, e = 1.675) { return Math.pow(k, e) }, 'ease-out': function(k, e = 1.675) { return 1 - Math.pow(1 - k, e) }, 'ease-in-out': function(k) { return .5*(Math.sin((k - .5)*Math.PI) + 1) }
};

The k value is the progress, which is the ratio between the current frame index cf and the actual number of frames the transition happens over anf. This means we modify the ani() function a bit if we want to use the ease-out option for example:

function ani(cf = 0) { _C.style.setProperty('--i', ini + (fin - ini)*TFN['ease-out'](cf/anf)); /* same as before */
};
Version with ease-out JavaScript transition (live demo).

We could also make things more interesting by using the kind of bouncing timing function that CSS cannot give us. For example, something like the one illustrated by the demo below (click to trigger a transition):

See the Pen by thebabydino (@thebabydino) on CodePen.

The graphic for this would be somewhat similar to that of the easeOutBounce timing function from easings.net.

Animated gif. Shows the graph of the bouncing timing function. This function has a slow, then accelerated increase from the initial value to its final value. Once it reaches the final value, it quickly bounces back by about a quarter of the distance between the final and initial value, then going back to the final value, again bouncing back a bit. In total, it bounces three times. On the right side, we have an animation of how the function value (the ordinate on the graph) changes in time (as we progress along the abscissa).
Graphical representation of the timing function.

The process for getting this kind of timing function is similar to that for getting the JavaScript version of the CSS ease-in-out (again, described in the previously linked article on emulating CSS timing functions with JavaScript).

We start with the cosine function on the [0, 90°] interval (or [0, π/2] in radians) for no bounce, [0, 270°] ([0, 3·π/2]) for 1 bounce, [0, 450°] ([0, 5·π/2]) for 2 bounces and so on… in general it’s the [0, (n + ½)·180°] interval ([0, (n + ½)·π]) for n bounces.

See the Pen by thebabydino (@thebabydino) on CodePen.

The input of this cos(k) function is in the [0, 450°] interval, while its output is in the [-1, 1] interval. But what we want is a function whose domain is the [0, 1] interval and whose codomain is also the [0, 1] interval.

We can restrict the codomain to the [0, 1] interval by only taking the absolute value |cos(k)|:

See the Pen by thebabydino (@thebabydino) on CodePen.

While we got the interval we wanted for the codomain, we want the value of this function at 0 to be 0 and its value at the other end of the interval to be 1. Currently, it’s the other way around, but we can fix this if we change our function to 1 - |cos(k)|:

See the Pen by thebabydino (@thebabydino) on CodePen.

Now we can move on to restricting the domain from the [0, (n + ½)·180°] interval to the [0, 1] interval. In order to do this, we change our function to be 1 - |cos(k·(n + ½)·180°)|:

See the Pen by thebabydino (@thebabydino) on CodePen.

This gives us both the desired domain and codomain, but we still have some problems.

First of all, all our bounces have the same height, but we want their height to decrease as k increases from 0 to 1. Our fix in this case is to multiply the cosine with 1 - k (or with a power of 1 - k for a non-linear decrease in amplitude). The interactive demo below shows how this amplitude changes for various exponents a and how this influences the function we have so far:

See the Pen by thebabydino (@thebabydino) on CodePen.

Secondly, all the bounces take the same amount of time, even though their amplitudes keep decreasing. The first idea here is to use a power of k inside the cosine function instead of just k. This manages to make things weird as the cosine doesn’t hit 0 at equal intervals anymore, meaning we don’t always get that f(1) = 1 anymore which is what we’d always need from a timing function we’re actually going to use. However, for something like a = 2.75, n = 3 and b = 1.5, we get a result that looks satisfying, so we’ll leave it at that, even though it could be tweaked for better control:

Screenshot of the previously linked demo showing the graphical result of the a = 2.75, n = 3 and b = 1.5 setup: a slow, then fast increase from 0 (for f(0)) to 1, bouncing back down less than half the way after reaching 1, going back up and then having another even smaller bounce before finishing at 1, where we always want to finish for f(1).
The timing function we want to try.

This is the function we try out in the JavaScript if we want some bouncing to happen.

const TFN = { /* the other function we had before */ 'bounce-out': function(k, n = 3, a = 2.75, b = 1.5) { return 1 - Math.pow(1 - k, a)*Math.abs(Math.cos(Math.pow(k, b)*(n + .5)*Math.PI)) }
};

Hmm, seems a bit too extreme in practice:

Version with a bouncing JavaScript transition (live demo).

Maybe we could make n depend on the amount of translation we still need to perform from the moment of the release. We make it into a variable which we then set in the move() function before calling the animation function ani():

const TFN = { /* the other function we had before */ 'bounce-out': function(k, a = 2.75, b = 1.5) { return 1 - Math.pow(1 - k, a)*Math.abs(Math.cos(Math.pow(k, b)*(n + .5)*Math.PI)) }
}; var n; function move(e) { if(locked) { let dx = unify(e).clientX - x0, s = Math.sign(dx), f = +(s*dx/w).toFixed(2); /* same as before */ n = 2 + Math.round(f) ani(); /* same as before */ }
};

This gives us our final result:

Version with the final bouncing JavaScript transition (live demo).

There’s definitely still room for improvement, but I don’t have a feel for what makes a good animation, so I’ll just leave it at that. As it is, this is now functional cross-browser (without have any of the Edge issues that the version using a CSS transition has) and pretty flexible.

The post Simple Swipe With Vanilla JavaScript appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

What Houdini Means for Animating Transforms

I’ve been playing with CSS transforms for over five years and one thing that has always bugged me was that I couldn’t animate the components of a transform chain individually. This article is going to explain the problem, the old workaround, the new magic Houdini solution and, finally, will offer you a feast of eye candy through better looking examples than those used to illustrate concepts.

The Problem

In order to better understand the issue at hand, let’s consider the example of a box we move horizontally across the screen. This means one div as far as the HTML goes:

<div class="box"></div>

The CSS is also pretty straightforward. We give this box dimensions, a background and position it in the middle horizontally with a margin.

$d: 4em; .box { margin: .25*$d auto; width: $d; height: $d; background: #f90;
}

See the Pen by thebabydino (@thebabydino) on CodePen.

Next, with the help of a translation along the x axis, we move it by half a viewport (50vw) to the left (in the negative direction of the x axis, the positive one being towards the right):

transform: translate(-50vw);

See the Pen by thebabydino (@thebabydino) on CodePen.

Now the left half of the box is outside the screen. Decreasing the absolute amount of translation by half its edge length puts it fully within the viewport while decreasing it by anything more, let’s say a full edge length (which is $d or 100%—remember that % values in translate() functions are relative to the dimensions of the element being translated), makes it not even touch the left edge of the viewport anymore.

transform: translate(calc(-1*(50vw - 100%)));

See the Pen by thebabydino (@thebabydino) on CodePen.

This is going to be our initial animation position.

We then create a set of @keyframes to move the box to the symmetrical position with respect to the initial one with no translation and reference them when setting the animation:

$t: 1.5s; .box { /* same styles as before */ animation: move $t ease-in-out infinite alternate;
} @keyframes move { to { transform: translate(calc(50vw - 100%)); }
}

This all works as expected, giving us a box that moves from left to right and back:

See the Pen by thebabydino (@thebabydino) on CodePen.

But this is a pretty boring animation, so let’s make it more interesting. Let’s say we want the box to be scaled down to a factor of .1 when it’s in the middle and have its normal size at the two ends. We could add one more keyframe:

50% { transform: scale(.1); }

The box now also scales (demo), but, since we’ve added an extra keyframe, the timing function is not applied for the whole animation anymore—just for the portions in between keyframes. This makes our translation slow in the middle (at 50%) as we now also have a keyframe there. So we need to tweak the timing function, both in the animation value and in the @keyframes. In our case, since we want to have an ease-in-out overall, we can split it into one ease-in and one ease-out.

.box { animation: move $t ease-in infinite alternate;
} @keyframes move { 50% { transform: scale(.1); animation-timing-function: ease-out; } to { transform: translate(calc(50vw - 100%)); }
}

See the Pen by thebabydino (@thebabydino) on CodePen.

Now all works fine, but what if we wanted different timing functions for the translation and scaling? The timing functions we’ve set mean the animation is slower at the beginning, faster in the middle and then slower again at the end. What if we wanted this to apply just to the translation, but not to the scale? What if we wanted the scaling to happen fast at the beginning, when it goes from 1 towards .1, slow in the middle when it’s around .1 and then fast again at the end when it goes back to 1?

SVG illustration. Shows the timeline, highlighting the 0%, 50% and 100% keyframes. At 0%, we want the translation to start slowly, but the scaling to start fast. At 50%, we want the translation to be at its fastest, while the scaling would be at its slowest. At 100%, the translation ends slowly, while the scaling ends fast.
The animation timeline (live).

Well, it’s just not possible to set different timing functions for different transform functions in the same chain. We cannot make the translation slow and the scaling fast at the beginning or the other way around in the middle. At least, not while what we animate is the transform property and they’re part of the same transform chain.

The Old Workaround

There are of course ways of going around this issue. Traditionally, the solution has been to split the transform (and consequently, the animation) over multiple elements. This gives us the following structure:

<div class="wrap"> <div class="box"></div>
</div>

We move the width property on the wrapper. Since div elements are block elements by default, this will also determine the width of its .box child without us having to set it explicitly. We keep the height on the .box however, as the height of a child (the .box in this case) also determines the height of its parent (the wrapper in this case).

We also move up the margin, transform and animation properties. In addition to this, we switch back to an ease-in-out timing function for this animation. We also modify the move set of @keyframes to what it was initially, so that we get rid of the scale().

.wrap { margin: .25*$d calc(50% - #{.5*$d}); width: $d; transform: translate(calc(-1*(50vw - 100%))); animation: move $t ease-in-out infinite alternate;
} @keyframes move { to { transform: translate(calc(50vw - 100%)); }
}

We create another set of @keyframes which we use for the actual .box element. This is an alternating animation of half the duration of the one producing the oscillatory motion.

.box { height: $d; background: #f90; animation: size .5*$t ease-out infinite alternate;
} @keyframes size { to { transform: scale(.1); } }

We now have the result we wanted:

See the Pen by thebabydino (@thebabydino) on CodePen.

This is a solid workaround that doesn’t add too much extra code, not to mention the fact that, in this particular case, we don’t really need two elements, we could do with just one and one of its pseudo-elements. But if our transform chain gets longer, we have no choice but to add extra elements. And, in 2018, we can do better than that!

The Houdini Solution

Some of you may already know that CSS variables are not animatable (and I guess anyone who didn’t just found out). If we try to use them in an animation, they just flip from one value to the other when half the time in between has elapsed.

Consider the initial example of the oscillating box (no scaling involved). Let’s say we try to animate it using a custom property --x:

.box { /* same styles as before */ transform: translate(var(--x, calc(-1*(50vw - #{$d})))); animation: move $t ease-in-out infinite alternate
} @keyframes move { to { --x: calc(50vw - #{$d}) } }

Sadly, this just results in a flip at 50%, the official reason being that browsers cannot know the type of the custom property (which doesn’t make sense to me, but I guess that doesn’t really matter).

See the Pen by thebabydino (@thebabydino) on CodePen.

But we can forget about all of this because now Houdini has entered the picture and we can register such custom properties so that we explicitly give them a type (the syntax).

For more info on this, check out the talk and slides by Serg Hospodarets.

CSS.registerProperty({ name: '--x', syntax: '<length>', initialValue: 0
});

We’ve set the initialValue to 0, because we have to set it to something and that something has to be a computationally independent value—that is, it cannot depend on anything we can set or change in the CSS and, given the initial and final translation values depend on the box dimensions, which we set in the CSS, calc(-1*(50vw - 100%)) is not valid here. It doesn’t even work to set --x to calc(-1*(50vw - 100%)), we need to use calc(-1*(50vw - #{$d})) instead.

$d: 4em;
$t: 1.5s; .box { margin: .25*$d auto; width: $d; height: $d; --x: calc(-1*(50vw - #{$d})); transform: translate(var(--x)); background: #f90; animation: move $t ease-in-out infinite alternate;
} @keyframes move { to { --x: calc(50vw - #{$d}); } }
Animated gif. Shows a square box oscillating horizontally from left to right and back. The motion is slow at the left and right ends and faster in the middle.
The simple oscillating box we get using the new method (live demo, needs Houdini support).

For now, this only works in Blink browsers behind the Experimental Web Platform features flag. This can be enabled from chrome://flags (or, if you’re using Opera, opera://flags):

Screenshot showing the Experimental Web Platform features flag being enabled in Chrome.
The Experimental Web Platform features flag enabled in Chrome.

In all other browsers, we still see the flip at 50%.

Applying this to our oscillating and scaling demo means we introduce two custom properties we register and animate—one is the translation amount along the x axis (--x) and the other one is the uniform scaling factor (--f).

CSS.registerProperty({ /* same as before */ }); CSS.registerProperty({ name: '--f', syntax: '<number>', initialValue: 1
});

The relevant CSS is as follows:

.box { --x: calc(-1*(50vw - #{$d})); transform: translate(var(--x)) scale(var(--f)); animation: move $t ease-in-out infinite alternate, size .5*$t ease-out infinite alternate;
} @keyframes move { to { --x: calc(50vw - #{$d}); } } @keyframes size { to { --f: .1 } }
Animated gif. Shows the same oscillating box from before now also scaling down to 10% when it's right in the middle. The scaling is fast at the beginning and the end and slow in the middle.
The oscillating and scaling with the new method (live demo, needs Houdini support).

Better Looking Stuff

A simple oscillating and scaling square isn’t the most exciting thing though, so let’s see nicer demos!

Screenshots of the two demos we dissect here. Left: a rotating wavy rainbow grid of cubes. Right: bouncing square.
More interesting examples. Left: rotating wavy grid of cubes. Right: bouncing square.

The 3D version

Going from 2D to 3D, the square becomes a cube and, since just one cube isn’t interesting enough, let’s have a whole grid of them!

We consider the body to be our scene. In this scene, we have a 3D assembly of cubes (.a3d). These cubes are distributed on a grid of nr rows and nc columns:

- var nr = 13, nc = 13;
- var n = nr*nc; .a3d while n-- .cube - var n6hedron= 6; // cube always has 6 faces while n6hedron-- .cube__face

The first thing we do is a few basic styles to create a scene with a perspective, put the whole assembly in the middle and put each cube face into its place. We won’t be going into the details of how to build a CSS cube because I’ve already dedicated a very detailed article to this topic, so if you need a recap, check that one out!

The result so far can be seen below – all the cubes stacked up in the middle of the scene:

Screenshot. Shows all cubes (as wireframes) in the same position in the middle of the scene, making it look as if there's only one wireframe.
All the cubes stacked up in the middle (live demo).

For all these cubes, their front half is in front of the plane of the screen and their back half is behind the plane of the screen. In the plane of the screen, we have a square section of our cube. This square is identical to the ones representing the cube faces.

See the Pen by thebabydino (@thebabydino) on CodePen.

Next, we set the column (--i) and row (--j) indices on groups of cubes. Initially, we set both these indices to 0 for all cubes.

.cube { --i: 0; --j: 0;
}

Since we have a number of cubes equal to the number of columns (nc) on every row, we then set the row index to 1 for all cubes after the first nc ones. Then, for all cubes after the first 2*nc ones, we set the row index to 2. And so on, until we’ve covered all nr rows:

style | .cube:nth-child(n + #{1*nc + 1}) { --j: 1 } | .cube:nth-child(n + #{2*nc + 1}) { --j: 2 } //- and so on | .cube:nth-child(n + #{(nr - 1)*nc + 1}) { --j: #{nr - 1} }

We can compact this in a loop:

style - for(var i = 1; i < nr; i++) { | .cube:nth-child(n + #{i*nc + 1}) { --j: #{i} } -}

Afterwards, we move on to setting the column indices. For the columns, we always need to skip a number of cubes equal to nc - 1 before we encounter another cube with the same index. So, for every cube, the nc-th cube after it is going to have the same index and we’re going to have nc such groups of cubes.

(We only need to set the index to the last nc - 1, because all cubes have the column index set to 0 initially, so we can skip the first group containing the cubes for which the column index is 0 – no need to set --i again to the same value it already has.)

style | .cube:nth-child(#{nc}n + 2) { --i: 1 } | .cube:nth-child(#{nc}n + 3) { --i: 2 } //- and so on | .cube:nth-child(#{nc}n + #{nc}) { --i: #{nc - 1} }

This, too, can be compacted in a loop:

style - for(var i = 1; i < nc; i++) { | .cube:nth-child(#{nc}n + #{i + 1}) { --i: #{i} } -}

Now that we have all the row and column indices set, we can distribute these cubes on a 2D grid in the plane of the screen using a 2D translate() transform, according to the illustration below, where each cube is represented by its square section in the plane of the screen and the distances are measured in between transform-origin points (which are, by default, at 50% 50% 0, so dead in the middle of the square cube sections from the plane of the screen):

SVG illustration. Shows how to create a basic grid of square, vertical cube sections with nc columns and nr rows starting from the position of the top left item. The top left item is on the first column (of index <code>0</code>) and on the first row (of index <code>0</code>). All items on the second column (of index <code>1</code>) are offset horizontally by and edge length. All items on the third column (of index <code>2</code>) are offset horizontally by two edge lengths. In general, all items on the column of index <code>i</code> are offset horizontally by <code>i</code> edge lengths. All items on the last column (of index <code>nc - 1</code>) are offset horizontally by <code>nc - 1</code> edge lengths. All items on the second row (of index <code>1</code>) are offset vertically by and edge length. All items on the third row (of index <code>2</code>) are offset vertically by two edge lengths. In general, all items on the row of index <code>j</code> are offset vertically by <code>j</code> edge lengths. All items on the last row (of index <code>nr - 1</code>) are offset vertically by <code>nr - 1</code> edge lengths.”/><figcaption>How to create a basic grid starting from the position of the top left item (live).</figcaption></figure>
<pre rel=/* $l is the cube edge length */ .cube { /* same as before */ --x: calc(var(--i)*#{$l}); --y: calc(var(--j)*#{$l}); transform: translate(var(--x), var(--y)); }

This gives us a grid, but it’s not in the middle of the screen.

Screenshot. Shows the grid with nc columns and nr rows, with cubes repersented as wireframes. The midpoint of the top left cube of the rectangular grid is dead in the middle of the screen..
The grid, having the midpoint of the top left cube in the middle of the screen (live demo).

Right now, it’s the central point of the top left cube that’s in the middle of the screen, as highlighted in the demo above. What we want is for the grid to be in the middle, meaning that we need to shift all cubes left and up (in the negative direction of both the x and y axes) by the horizontal and vertical differences between half the grid dimensions (calc(.5*var(--nc)*#{$l}) and calc(.5*var(--nr)*#{$l}), respectively) and the distances between the top left corner of the grid and the midpoint of the top left cube’s vertical cross-section in the plane of the screen (these distances are each half the cube edge, or .5*$l).

The difference between the position of the grid midpoint and the top left item midpoint (live).

Subtracting these differences from the previous amounts, our code becomes:

.cube { /* same as before */ --x: calc(var(--i)*#{$l} - (.5*var(--nc)*#{$l} - .5*#{$l})); --y: calc(var(--j)*#{$l} - (.5*var(--nr)*#{$l} - .5*#{$l}));
}

Or even better:

.cube { /* same as before */ --x: calc((var(--i) - .5*(var(--nc) - 1))*#{$l})); --y: calc((var(--j) - .5*(var(--nr) - 1))*#{$l}));
}

We also need to make sure we set the --nc and --nr custom properties:

- var nr = 13, nc = 13;
- var n = nr*nc; //- same as before
.a3d(style=`--nc: ${nc}; --nr: ${nr}`) //- same as before

This gives us a grid that’s in the middle of the viewport:

Screenshot. Shows a grid of cube wireframes right in the middle.
The grid is now in the middle (live).

We’ve also made the cube edge length $l smaller so that the grid fits within the viewport.

Alternatively, we can go for a CSS variable --l instead so that we can control the edge length depending on the number of columns and rows. The first step here is setting the maximum of the two to a --nmax variable:

- var nr = 13, nc = 13;
- var n = nr*nc; //- same as before
.a3d(style=`--nc: ${nc}; --nr: ${nr}; --max: ${Math.max(nc, nr)}`) //- same as before

Then, we set the edge length (--l) to something like 80% (completely arbitrary value) of the minimum viewport dimension over this maximum (--max):

.cube { /* same as before */ --l: calc(80vmin/var(--max));
}

Finally, we update the cube and face transforms, the face dimensions and margin to use --l instead of $l:

.cube { /* same as before */ --l: calc(80vmin/var(--max)); --x: calc((var(--i) - .5*(var(--nc) - 1))*var(--l)); --y: calc((var(--j) - .5*(var(--nr) - 1))*var(--l)); &__face { /* same as before */ margin: calc(-.5*var(--l)); width: var(--l); height: var(--l); transform: rotate3d(var(--i), var(--j), 0, calc(var(--m, 1)*#{$ba4gon})) translatez(calc(.5*var(--l))); }
}

Now we have a nice responsive grid!

Animated gif. Shows the previously created grid scaling with the viewport.
The grid is now in the middle and responsive such that it always fits within the viewport (live).

But it’s an ugly one, so let’s turn it into a pretty rainbow by making the color of each cube depend on its column index (--i):

.cube { /* same as before */ color: hsl(calc(var(--i)*360/var(--nc)), 65%, 65%);
}
Screenshot. The assembly wireframe has now a rainbow look, with every column of cubes having a different hue.
The rainbow grid (live demo).

We’ve also made the scene background dark so that we have better contrast with the now lighter cube edges.

To spice things up even further, we add a row rotation around the y axis depending on the row index (--j):

.cube { /* same as before */ transform: rotateY(calc(var(--j)*90deg/var(--nr))) translate(var(--x), var(--y));
}
Screenshot. The assembly wireframe now appears twisted, with every row being rotated at a different angle, increasing from top to bottom.
The twisted grid (live demo).

We’ve also decreased the cube edge length --l and increased the perspective value in order to allow this twisted grid to fit in.

Now comes the fun part! For every cube, we animate its position back and forth along the z axis by half the grid width (we make the translate() a translate3d() and use an additional custom property --z that goes between calc(.5*var(--nc)*var(--l)) and calc(-.5*var(--nc)*var(--l))) and its size (via a uniform scale3d() of factor --f that goes between 1 and .1). This is pretty much the same thing we did for the square in our original example, except the motion now happens along the z axis, not along the x axis and the scaling happens in 3D, not just in 2D.

$t: 1s; .cube { /* same as before */ --z: calc(var(--m)*.5*var(--nc)*var(--l)); transform: rotateY(calc(var(--j)*90deg/var(--nr))) translate3d(var(--x), var(--y), var(--z)) scale3d(var(--f), var(--f), var(--f)); animation: a $t ease-in-out infinite alternate; animation-name: move, zoom; animation-duration: $t, .5*$t;
} @keyframes move { to { --m: -1 } } @keyframes zoom { to { --f: .1 } }

This doesn’t do anything until we register the multiplier --m and the scaling factor --f to give them a type and an initial value:

CSS.registerProperty({ name: '--m', syntax: '<number>', initialValue: 1
}); CSS.registerProperty({ name: '--f', syntax: '<number>', initialValue: 1
});
Animated gif. Every cube now moves back and forth along its own z axis (post row rotation), between half a grid width behind its xOy plane and half a grid width in front of its xOy plane. Each cube also scales along all three axes, going from its initial size to a tenth of it along each axis and then back to its initial size.
The animated grid (live demo, needs Houdini support).

At this point, all cubes animate at the same time. To make things more interesting, we add a delay that depends on both the column and row index:

animation-delay: calc((var(--i) + var(--j))*#{-2*$t}/(var(--nc) + var(--nr)));
Screenshot
The waving grid effect (live).

The final touch is to add a rotation on the 3D assembly:

.a3d { top: 50%; left: 50%; animation: ry 8s linear infinite;
} @keyframes ry { to { transform: rotateY(1turn); } }

We also make the faces opaque by giving them a black background and we have the final result:

Animated gif. Now the cube faces are opaque (we've given them a black background) whole assembly rotates around its y axis, making the animation more interesting.
The final result (live demo, needs Houdini support).

The performance for this is pretty bad, as it can be seen from the GIF recording above, but it’s still interesting to see how far we can push things.

Hopping Square

I came across the original in a comment to another article and, as soon as I saw the code, I thought it was the perfect candidate for a makeover using some Houdini magic!

Let’s start by understanding what is happening in the original code.

In the HTML, we have nine divs.


<div class="frame"> <div class="center"> <div class="down"> <div class="up"> <div class="squeeze"> <div class="rotate-in"> <div class="rotate-out"> <div class="square"></div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="shadow"></div> </div>
</div>

Now, this animation is a lot more complex than anything I could ever come up with, but, even so, nine elements seems to be overkill. So let’s take a look at the CSS, see what they’re each used for and see how much we can simplify the code in preparation for switching to the Houdini-powered solution.

Let’s start with the animated elements. The .down and .up elements each have an animation related to moving the square vertically:

/* original */
.down { position: relative; animation: down $duration ease-in infinite both; .up { animation: up $duration ease-in-out infinite both; /* the rest */ }
} @keyframes down { 0% { transform: translateY(-100px); } 20%, 100% { transform: translateY(0); }
} @keyframes up { 0%, 75% { transform: translateY(0); } 100% { transform: translateY(-100px); }
}

With @keyframes and animations on both elements having the same duration, we can pull off a make-one-out-of-two trick.

In the case of the first set of @keyframes, all the action (going from -100px to 0) happens in the [0%, 20%] interval, while, in the case of the second one, all the action (going from 0 to -100px) happens in the [75%, 100%] interval. These two intervals don’t intersect. Because of this and because both animations have the same duration we can add up the translation values at each keyframe.

  • at 0%, we have -100px from the first set of @keyframes and 0 from the second, which gives us -100px
  • at 20%, we have 0 from the first set of @keyframes and 0 from the second (as we have 0 for any frame from 0% to 75%), which gives us 0
  • at 75%, we have 0 from the first set of @keyframes (as we have 0 for any frame from 20% to 100%) and 0 from the second, which gives us 0
  • at 100%, we have 0 from the first set of @keyframes and -100px from the second, which gives us -100px

Our new code is as follows. We have removed the animation-fill-mode from the shorthand as it doesn’t do anything in this case since our animation loops infinitely, has a non-zero duration and no delay:

/* new */
.jump { position: relative; transform: translateY(-100px); animation: jump $duration ease-in infinite; /* the rest */
} @keyframes jump { 20%, 75% { transform: translateY(0); animation-timing-function: ease-in-out; }
}

Note that we have different timing functions for the two animations, so we need to switch between them in the @keyframes. We still have the same effect, but we got rid of one element and one set of @keyframes.

Next, we do the same thing for the .rotate-in and .rotate-out elements and their @keyframes:

/* original */
.rotate-in { animation: rotate-in $duration ease-out infinite both; .rotate-out { animation: rotate-out $duration ease-in infinite both; }
} @keyframes rotate-in { 0% { transform: rotate(-135deg); } 20%, 100% { transform: rotate(0deg); }
} @keyframes rotate-out { 0%, 80% { transform: rotate(0); } 100% { transform: rotate(135deg); }
}

In a similar manner to the previous case, we add up the rotation values for each keyframe.

  • at 0%, we have -135deg from the first set of @keyframes and 0deg from the second, which gives us -135deg
  • at 20%, we have 0deg from the first set of @keyframes and 0deg from the second (as we have 0deg for any frame from 0% to 80%), which gives us 0deg
  • at 80%, we have 0deg from the first set of @keyframes (as we have 0deg for any frame from 20% to 100%) and 0deg from the second, which gives us 0deg
  • at 100%, we have 0deg from the first set of @keyframes and 135deg from the second, which gives us 135deg

This means we can compact things to:

/* new */
.rotate { transform: rotate(-135deg); animation: rotate $duration ease-out infinite;
} @keyframes rotate { 20%, 80% { transform: rotate(0deg); animation-timing-function: ease-in; } 100% { transform: rotate(135deg); }
}

We only have one element with a scaling transform that distorts our white square:

/* original */
.squeeze { transform-origin: 50% 100%; animation: squeeze $duration $easing infinite both;
} @keyframes squeeze { 0%, 4% { transform: scale(1); } 45% { transform: scale(1.8, 0.4); } 100% { transform: scale(1); }
}

There’s not really much we can do here in terms of compacting the code, save for removing the animation-fill-mode and grouping the 100% keyframe with the 0% and 4% ones:

/* new */
.squeeze { transform-origin: 50% 100%; animation: squeeze $duration $easing infinite;
} @keyframes squeeze { 0%, 4%, 100% { transform: scale(1); } 45% { transform: scale(1.8, .4); }
}

The innermost element (.square) is only used to display the white box and has no transform set on it.

 /* original */
.square { width: 100px; height: 100px; background: #fff;
}

This means we can get rid of it if we move its styles to its parent element.

/* new */
$d: 6.25em; .rotate { width: $d; height: $d; transform: rotate(-135deg); background: #fff; animation: rotate $duration ease-out infinite;
}

We got rid of three elements so far and our structure has become:

.frame .center .jump .squeeze .rotate .shadow

The outermost element (.frame) serves as a scene or container. This is the big blue square.

/* original */
.frame { position: absolute; top: 50%; left: 50%; width: 400px; height: 400px; margin-top: -200px; margin-left: -200px; border-radius: 2px; box-shadow: 1px 2px 10px 0px rgba(0,0,0,0.2); overflow: hidden; background: #3498db; color: #fff; font-family: 'Open Sans', Helvetica, sans-serif; -webkit-font-smoothing: antialiased; -moz-osx-font-smoothing: grayscale;
}

There’s no text in this demo, so we can get rid of the text-related properties. We can also get rid of the color property since, not only do we not have text anywhere in this demo, but we’re also not using this for any borders, shadows, backgrounds (via currentColor) and so on.

We can also avoid taking this containing element out of the document flow by using a flexbox layout on the body. This also eliminates the offsets and the margin properties.

/* new */
$s: 4*$d; body { display: flex; align-items: center; justify-content: center; height: 100vh;
} .frame { overflow: hidden; position: relative; width: $s; height: $s; border-radius: 2px; box-shadow: 1px 2px 10px rgba(#000, .2); background: #3498db;
}

We’ve also tied the dimensions of this element to those of the hopping square.

The .center element is only used for positioning its direct children (.jump and .shadow), so we can take it out altogether and use the offsets on it directly on these children.

We use absolute positioning on all .frame descendants. This makes the .jump and .squeeze elements 0x0 boxes, so we tweak the transform-origin for the squeezing transform (100% of 0 is always 0, but the value we want is half the square edge length .5*$d). We also set a margin of minus half the square edge length (-.5*$d) on the .rotate element (to compensate for the translate(-50%, -50%) we had on the removed .center element).

/* new */
.frame * { position: absolute, } .jump { top: $top; left: $left; /* same as before */
} .squeeze { transform-origin: 50% .5*$d; /* same as before */
} .rotate { margin: -.5*$d; /* same as before */
}

Finally, let’s take a look at the .shadow element.

/* original */
.shadow { position: absolute; z-index: -1; bottom: -2px; left: -4px; right: -4px; height: 2px; border-radius: 50%; background: rgba(0,0,0,0.2); box-shadow: 0 0 0px 8px rgba(0,0,0,0.2); animation: shadow $duration ease-in-out infinite both;
} @keyframes shadow { 0%, 100% { transform: scaleX(.5); } 45%, 50% { transform: scaleX(1.8); }
}

We’re of course removing the position since we’ve already set that for all descendants of the .frame. We can also get rid of the z-index if we move the .shadow before the .jump element in the DOM.

Next, we have the offsets. The midpoint of the shadow is offset by $left (just like the .jump element) horizontally and by $top plus half a square edge length (.5*$d) vertically.

We see a height that’s set to 2px. Along the other axis, the width computes to the square’s edge length ($d) plus 4px from the left and 4px from the right. That’s plus 8px in total. But one thing we notice is that the box-shadow with an 8px spread and no blur is just an extension of the background. So we can just increase the dimensions of the our element by twice the spread along both axes and get rid of the box-shadow altogether.

Just like in the case of the other elements, we also get rid of the animation-fill-mode from the animation shorthand:

/* new */
.shadow { margin: .5*($d - $sh-h) (-.5*$sh-w); width: $sh-w; height: $sh-h; border-radius: 50%; transform: scaleX(.5); background: rgba(#000, .2); animation: shadow $duration ease-in-out infinite;
} @keyframes shadow { 45%, 50% { transform: scaleX(1.8); }
}

We’ve now reduced the code in the original demo by about 40% while still getting the same result.

See the Pen by thebabydino (@thebabydino) on CodePen.

Our next step is to merge the .jump, .squeeze and rotate components into one, so that we go from three elements to a single one. Just as a reminder, the relevant styles we have at this point are:

.jump { transform: translateY(-100px); animation: jump $duration ease-in infinite;
} .squeeze { transform-origin: 50% .5*$d; animation: squeeze $duration $easing infinite;
} .rotate { transform: rotate(-135deg); animation: rotate $duration ease-out infinite;
} @keyframes jump { 20%, 75% { transform: translateY(0); animation-timing-function: ease-in-out; }
} @keyframes squeeze { 0%, 4%, 100% { transform: scale(1); } 45% { transform: scale(1.8, .4); }
} @keyframes rotate { 20%, 80% { transform: rotate(0deg); animation-timing-function: ease-in; } 100% { transform: rotate(135deg); }
}

The only problem here is that the scaling transform has a transform-origin that’s different from the default 50% 50%. Fortunately, we can go around that.

Any transform with a transform-origin different from the default is equivalent to a transform chain with default transform-origin that first translates the element such that its default transform-origin point (the 50% 50% point in the case of HTML elements and the 0 0 point of the viewBox in the case of SVG elements) goes to the desired transform-origin, applies the actual transformation we want (scaling, rotation, shearing, a combination of these… doesn’t matter) and then applies the reverse translation (the values for each of the axes of coordinates are multiplied by -1).

Any transform with a transform with a transform-origin different from the default is equivalent to a chain that translates the point of the default transform-origin to that of the custom one, performs the desired transform and then reverses the initial translation (live demo).

Putting this into code means that if we have any transform with transform-origin: $x1 $y1, the following two are equivalent:

/* transform on HTML element with transform-origin != default */ transform-origin: $x1 $y1;
transform: var(--transform); /* can be rotation, scaling, shearing */ /* equivalent transform chain on HTML element with default transform-origin */
transform: translate(calc(#{$x1} - 50%), calc(#{$y1} - 50%)) var(--transform) translate(calc(50% - #{$x1}), calc(50% - $y1);

In our particular case, we have the default transform-origin value along the x axis, so we only need to perform a translation along the y axis. By also replacing the hardcoded values with variables, we get the following transform chain:

transform: translateY(var(--y)) translateY(.5*$d) scale(var(--fx), var(--fy)) translateY(-.5*$d) rotate(var(--az));

We can compact this a bit by joining the first two translations:

transform: translateY(calc(var(--y) + #{.5*$d})) scale(var(--fx), var(--fy)) translateY(-.5*$d) rotate(var(--az));

We also put the three animations on the three elements into just one:

animation: jump $duration ease-in infinite, squeeze $duration $easing infinite, rotate $duration ease-out infinite;

And we modify the @keyframes so that we now animate the newly-introduced custom properties --y, --fx, --fy and --az:

@keyframes jump { 20%, 75% { --y: 0; animation-timing-function: ease-in-out; }
} @keyframes squeeze { 0%, 4%, 100% { --fx: 1; --fy: 1 } 45% { --fx: 1.8; --fy: .4 }
} @keyframes rotate { 20%, 80% { --az: 0deg; animation-timing-function: ease-in; } 100% { --az: 135deg }
}

However, this won’t work unless we register these CSS variables we have introduced and want to animate:

CSS.registerProperty({ 'name': '--y', 'syntax': '<length>', 'initialValue': '-100px'
}); CSS.registerProperty({ 'name': '--fx', 'syntax': '<number>', 'initialValue': 1
}); /* exactly the same for --fy */ CSS.registerProperty({ 'name': '--az', 'syntax': '<angle>', 'initialValue': '-135deg'
});

We now have a working demo of the method animating CSS variables. But given that our structure is now one wrapper with two children, we can reduce it further to one element and two pseudo-elements, thus getting the final version which can be seen below. It’s worth noting that this only works in Blink browsers with the Experimental Web Platform features flag enabled.

Animated gif. The square rotates in the air, falls down and gets squished against the ground, then bounces back up and the cycle repeats.
The final result (live, needs Houdini support)

The post What Houdini Means for Animating Transforms appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

Animating Border

Transitioning border for a hover state. Simple, right? You might be unpleasantly surprised.

The Challenge

The challenge is simple: building a button with an expanding border on hover.

This article will focus on genuine CSS tricks that would be easy to drop into any project without having to touch the DOM or use JavaScript. The methods covered here will follow these rules

  • Single element (no helper divs, but psuedo-elements are allowed)
  • CSS only (no JavaScript)
  • Works for any size (not restricted to a specific width, height, or aspect ratio)
  • Supports transparent backgrounds
  • Smooth and performant transition

I proposed this challenge in the Animation at Work Slack and again on Twitter. Though there was no consensus on the best approach, I did receive some really clever ideas by some phenomenal developers.

Method 1: Animating border

The most straightforward way to animate a border is… well, by animating border.

.border-button { border: solid 5px #FC5185; transition: border-width 0.6s linear;
} .border-button:hover { border-width: 10px; }

See the Pen by Shaw (@shshaw) on CodePen.

Nice and simple, but there are some big performance issues.

Since border takes up space in the document’s layout, changing the border-width will trigger layout. Nearby elements will shift around because of the new border size, making browser reposition those elements every frame of the animation unless you set an explicit size on the button.

As if triggering layout wasn’t bad enough, the transition itself feels “stepped”. I’ll show why in the next example.

Method 2: Better border with outline

How can we change the border without triggering layout? By using outline instead! You’re probably most familiar with outline from removing it on :focus styles (though you shouldn’t), but outline is an outer line that doesn’t change an element’s size or position in the layout.

.border-button { outline: solid 5px #FC5185; transition: outline 0.6s linear; margin: 0.5em; /* Increased margin since the outline expands outside the element */
} .border-button:hover { outline-width: 10px; }

See the Pen by Shaw (@shshaw) on CodePen.

A quick check in Dev Tools’ Performance tab shows the outline transition does not trigger layout. Regardless, the movement still seems stepped because browsers are rounding the border-width and outline-width values so you don’t get sub-pixel rendering between 5 and 6 or smooth transitions from 5.4 to 5.5.

See the Pen by Shaw (@shshaw) on CodePen.

Strangely, Safari often doesn’t render the outline transition and occasionally leaves crazy artifacts.

border artifact in safari

Method 3: Cut it with clip-path

First implemented by Steve Gardner, this method uses clip-path with calc to trim the border down so on hover we can transition to reveal the full border.

.border-button { /* Full width border and a clip-path visually cutting it down to the starting size */ border: solid 10px #FC5185; clip-path: polygon( calc(0% + 5px) calc(0% + 5px), /* top left */ calc(100% - 5px) calc(0% + 5px), /* top right */ calc(100% - 5px) calc(100% - 5px), /* bottom right */ calc(0% + 5px) calc(100% - 5px) /* bottom left */ ); transition: clip-path 0.6s linear;
} .border-button:hover { /* Clip-path spanning the entire box so it's no longer hiding the full-width border. */ clip-path: polygon(0 0, 100% 0, 100% 100%, 0 100%);
}

See the Pen by Shaw (@shshaw) on CodePen.

clip-path technique is the smoothest and most performant method so far, but does come with a few caveats. Rounding errors may cause a little unevenness, depending on the exact size. The border also has to be full size from the start, which may make exact positioning tricky.

Unfortunately there’s no IE/Edge support yet, though it seems to be in development. You can and should encourage Microsoft’s team to implement those features by voting for masks/clip-path to be added.

Method 4: linear-gradient background

We can simulate a border using a clever combination of multiple linear-gradient backgrounds properly sized. In total we have four separate gradients, one for each side. The background-position and background-size properties get each gradient in the right spot and the right size, which can then be transitioned to make the border expand.

.border-button { background-repeat: no-repeat; /* background-size values will repeat so we only need to declare them once */ background-size: calc(100% - 10px) 5px, /* top & bottom */ 5px calc(100% - 10px); /* right & left */ background-position: 5px 5px, /* top */ calc(100% - 5px) 5px, /* right */ 5px calc(100% - 5px), /* bottom */ 5px 5px; /* left */ /* Since we're sizing and positioning with the above properties, we only need to set up a simple solid-color gradients for each side */ background-image: linear-gradient(0deg, #FC5185, #FC5185), linear-gradient(0deg, #FC5185, #FC5185), linear-gradient(0deg, #FC5185, #FC5185), linear-gradient(0deg, #FC5185, #FC5185); transition: all 0.6s linear; transition-property: background-size, background-position;
} .border-button:hover { background-position: 0 0, 100% 0, 0 100%, 0 0; background-size: 100% 10px, 10px 100%, 100% 10px, 10px 100%;
}

See the Pen by Shaw (@shshaw) on CodePen.

This method is quite difficult to set up and has quite a few cross-browser differences. Firefox and Safari animate the faux-border smoothly, exactly the effect we’re looking for. Chrome’s animation is jerky and even more stepped than the outline and border transitions. IE and Edge refuse to animate the background at all, but they do give the proper border expansion effect.

Method 5: Fake it with box-shadow

Hidden within box-shadow‘s spec is a fourth value for spread-radius. Set all the other length values to 0px and use the spread-radius to build your border alternative that, like outline, won’t affect layout.

.border-button { box-shadow: 0px 0px 0px 5px #FC5185; transition: box-shadow 0.6s linear; margin: 0.5em; /* Increased margin since the box-shado expands outside the element, like outline */
} .border-button:hover { box-shadow: 0px 0px 0px 10px #FC5185; }

See the Pen by Shaw (@shshaw) on CodePen.

The transition with box-shadow is adequately performant and feels much smoother, except in Safari where it’s snapping to whole-values during the transition like border and outline.

Pseudo-Elements

Several of these techniques can be modified to use a pseudo-element instead, but pseudo-elements ended up causing some additional performance issues in my tests.

For the box-shadow method, the transition occasionally triggered paint in a much larger area than necessary. Reinier Kaper pointed out that a pseudo-element can help isolate the paint to a more specific area. As I ran further tests, box-shadow was no longer causing paint in large areas of the document and the complication of the pseudo-element ended up being less performant. The change in paint and performance may have been due to a Chrome update, so feel free to test for yourself.

I also could not find a way to utilize pseudo-elements in a way that would allow for transform based animation.

Why not transform: scale?

You may be firing up Twitter to helpfully suggest using transform: scale for this. Since transform and opacity are the best style properties to animate for performance, why not use a pseudo-element and have the border scale up & down?

.border-button { position: relative; margin: 0.5em; border: solid 5px transparent; background: #3E4377;
} .border-button:after { content: ''; display: block; position: absolute; top: 0; right: 0; bottom: 0; left: 0; border: solid 10px #FC5185; margin: -15px; z-index: -1; transition: transform 0.6s linear; transform: scale(0.97, 0.93);
} .border-button:hover::after { transform: scale(1,1); }

See the Pen by Shaw (@shshaw) on CodePen.

There are a few issues:

  1. The border will show through a transparent button. I forced a background on the button to show how the border is hiding behind the button. If your design calls for buttons with a full background, then this could work.
  2. You can’t scale the border to specific sizes. Since the button’s dimensions vary with the text, there’s no way to animate the border from exactly 5px to 10px using only CSS. In this example I’ve done some magic-numbers on the scale to get it to appear right, but that won’t be universal.
  3. The border animates unevenly because the button’s aspect ratio isn’t 1:1. This usually means the left/right will appear larger than the top/bottom until the animation completes. This may not be an issue depending on how fast your transition is, the button’s aspect ratio, and how big your border is.

If your button has set dimensions, Cher pointed out a clever way to calculate the exact scales needed, though it may be subject to some rounding errors.

Beyond CSS

If we loosen our rules a bit, there are many interesting ways you can animate borders. Codrops consistently does outstanding work in this area, usually utilizing SVGs and JavaScript. The end results are very satisfying, though they can be a bit complex to implement. Here are a few worth checking out:

  • Creative Buttons
  • Button Styles Inspiration
  • Animated Checkboxes
  • Distorted Button Effects
  • Progress Button Styles

Conclusion

There’s more to borders than simply border, but if you want to animate a border you may have some trouble. The methods covered here will help, though none of them are a perfect solution. Which you choose will depend on your project’s requirements, so I’ve laid out a comparison table to help you decide.

See the Pen by Shaw (@shshaw) on CodePen.

My recommendation would be to use box-shadow, which has the best overall balance of ease-of-implementation, animation effect, performance and browser support.

Do you have another way of creating an animated border? Perhaps a clever way to utilize transforms for moving a border? Comment below or reach me on Twitter to share your solution to the challenge.

Special thanks to Martin Pitt, Steve Gardner, Cher, Reinier Kaper, Joseph Rex, David Khourshid, and the Animation at Work community.


Animating Border is a post from CSS-Tricks

Animating Layouts with the FLIP Technique

User interfaces are most effective when they are intuitive and easily understandable to the user. Animation plays a major role in this – as Nick Babich said, animation brings user interfaces to life. However, adding meaningful transitions and micro-interactions is often an afterthought, or something that is “nice to have” if time permits. All too often, we experience web apps that simply “jump” from view to view without giving the user time to process what just happened in the current context.

This leads to unintuitive user experiences, but we can do better, by avoiding “jump cuts” and “teleportation” in creating UIs. After all, what’s more natural than real life, where nothing teleports (except maybe car keys), and everything you interact with moves with natural motion?

In this article, we’ll explore a technique called “FLIP” that can be used to animate the positions and dimensions of any DOM element in a performant manner, regardless of how their layout is calculated or rendered (e.g., height, width, floats, absolute positioning, transform, flexbox, grid, etc.)

Why the FLIP technique?

Have you ever tried to animate height, width, top, left, or any other properties besides transform and opacity? You might have noticed that the animations look a bit janky, and there’s a reason for that. When any property that triggers layout changes (such as `height`), the browser has to recursively check if any other element’s layout has changed as a result, and that can be expensive. If that calculation takes longer than one animation frame (around 16.7 milliseconds), then the animation frame will be skipped, resulting in “jank” since that frame wasn’t rendered in time. In Paul Lewis’ article “Pixels are Expensive”, he goes further in depth at how pixels are rendered and the various performance expenses.

In short, our goal is to be short – we want to calculate the least amount of style changes necessary, as quickly as possible. The key to this is only animating transform and opacity, and FLIP explains how we can simulate layout changes using only transform.

What is FLIP?

FLIP is a mnemonic device and technique first coined by Paul Lewis, which stands for First, Last, Invert, Play. His article contains an excellent explanation of the technique, but I’ll outline it here:

  • First: before anything happens, record the current (i.e., first) position and dimensions of the element that will transition. You can use element.getBoundingClientRect() for this, as will be shown below.
  • Last: execute the code that causes the transition to instantaneously happen, and record the final (i.e., last) position and dimensions of the element.*
  • Invert: since the element is in the last position, we want to create the illusion that it’s in the first position, by using transform to modify its position and dimensions. This takes a little math, but it’s not too difficult.
  • Play: with the element inverted (and pretending to be in the first position), we can move it back to its last position by setting its transform to none.

Below is how these steps can be implemented with the Web Animations API:

const elm = document.querySelector('.some-element'); // First: get the current bounds
const first = elm.getBoundingClientRect(); // execute the script that causes layout change
doSomething(); // Last: get the final bounds
const last = elm.getBoundingClientRect(); // Invert: determine the delta between the // first and last bounds to invert the element
const deltaX = first.left - last.left;
const deltaY = first.top - last.top;
const deltaW = first.width / last.width;
const deltaH = first.height / last.height; // Play: animate the final element from its first bounds
// to its last bounds (which is no transform)
elm.animate([{ transformOrigin: 'top left', transform: ` translate(${deltaX}px, ${deltaY}px) scale(${deltaW}, ${deltaH}) `
}, { transformOrigin: 'top left', transform: 'none'
}], { duration: 300, easing: 'ease-in-out', fill: 'both'
});

Note: At the time of writing, the Web Animations API is not yet supported in all browsers. However, you can use a polyfill.

See the Pen How the FLIP technique works by David Khourshid (@davidkpiano) on CodePen.

There are two important things to note:

  1. If the element’s size changed, you can transform scale in order to “resize” it with no performance penalty; however, make sure to set transformOrigin to 'top left' since that’s where we based our delta calculations.
  2. We’re using the Web Animations API to animate the element here, but you’re free to use any other animation engine, such as GSAP, Anime, Velocity, Just-Animate, Mo.js and more.

Shared Element Transitions

One common use-case for transitioning an element between app views and states is that the final element might not be the same DOM element as the initial element. In Android, this is similar to a shared element transition, except that the element isn’t “recycled” from view to view in the DOM as it is on Android.
Nevertheless, we can still achieve the FLIP transition with a little magic illusion:

const firstElm = document.querySelector('.first-element'); // First: get the bounds and then hide the element (if necessary)
const first = firstElm.getBoundingClientRect();
firstElm.style.setProperty('visibility', 'hidden'); // execute the script that causes view change
doSomething(); // Last: get the bounds of the element that just appeared
const lastElm = document.querySelector('.last-element');
const last = lastElm.getBoundingClientRect(); // continue with the other steps, just as before.
// remember: you're animating the lastElm, not the firstElm.

Below is an example of how two completely disparate elements can appear to be the same element using shared element transitions. Click one of the pictures to see the effect.

See the Pen FLIP example with WAAPI by David Khourshid (@davidkpiano) on CodePen.

Parent-Child Transitions

With the previous implementations, the element bounds are based on the window. For most use cases, this is fine, but consider this scenario:

  • An element changes position and needs to transition.
  • That element contains a child element, which itself needs to transition to a different position inside the parent.

Since the previously calculated bounds are relative to the window, our calculations for the child element are going to be off. To solve this, we need to ensure that the bounds are calculated relative to the parent element instead:

const parentElm = document.querySelector('.parent');
const childElm = document.querySelector('.parent > .child'); // First: parent and child
const parentFirst = parentElm.getBoundingClientRect();
const childFirst = childElm.getBoundingClientRect(); doSomething(); // Last: parent and child
const parentLast = parentElm.getBoundingClientRect();
const childLast = childElm.getBoundingClientRect(); // Invert: parent
const parentDeltaX = parentFirst.left - parentLast.left;
const parentDeltaY = parentFirst.top - parentLast.top; // Invert: child relative to parent
const childDeltaX = (childFirst.left - parentFirst.left) - (childLast.left - parentLast.left);
const childDeltaY = (childFirst.top - parentFirst.top) - (childLast.top - parentLast.top); // Play: using the WAAPI
parentElm.animate([ { transform: `translate(${parentDeltaX}px, ${parentDeltaY}px)` }, { transform: 'none' }
], { duration: 300, easing: 'ease-in-out' }); childElm.animate([ { transform: `translate(${childDeltaX}px, ${childDeltaY}px)` }, { transform: 'none' }
], { duration: 300, easing: 'ease-in-out' });

A few things to note here, as well:

  1. The timing options for the parent and child (duration, easing, etc.) do not necessarily need to match with this technique. Feel free to be creative!
  2. Changing dimensions in parent and/or child (width, height) was purposefully omitted in this example, since it is an advanced and complex topic. Let’s save that for another tutorial.
  3. You can combine the shared element and parent-child techniques for greater flexibility.

Using Flipping.js for Full Flexibility

The above techniques might seem straightforward, but they can get quite tedious to code once you have to keep track of multiple elements transitioning. Android eases this burden by:

  • baking shared element transitions into the core SDK
  • allowing developers to identify which elements are shared by using a common android:transitionName XML attribute

I’ve created a small library called Flipping.js with the same idea in mind. By adding a data-flip-key="..." attribute to HTML elements, it’s possible to predictably and efficiently keep track of elements that might change position and dimensions from state to state.

For example, consider this initial view:

 <section class="gallery"> <div class="photo-1" data-flip-key="photo-1"> <img src="/photo-1"/> </div> <div class="photo-2" data-flip-key="photo-2"> <img src="/photo-2"/> </div> <div class="photo-3" data-flip-key="photo-3"> <img src="/photo-3"/> </div> </section>

And this separate detail view:

 <section class="details"> <div class="photo" data-flip-key="photo-1"> <img src="/photo-1"/> </div> <p class="description"> Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet... </section>

Notice in the above example that there are 2 elements with the same data-flip-key="photo-1". Flipping.js tracks the “active” element by choosing the first element that meet these criteria:

  • The element exists in the DOM (i.e., it hasn’t been removed or detached)
  • The element is not hidden (hint: elm.getBoundingClientRect() will have { width: 0, height: 0 } for hidden elements)
  • Any custom logic specified in the selectActive option.

Getting Started with Flipping.js

There’s a few different packages for Flipping, depending on your needs:

  • flipping.js: tiny and low-level; only emits events when element bounds change
  • flipping.web.js: uses WAAPI to animate transitions
  • flipping.gsap.js: uses GSAP to animate transitions
  • More adapters coming soon!

You can grab the minified code directly from unpkg:

  • https://unpkg.com/flipping@latest/dist/flipping.js
  • https://unpkg.com/flipping@latest/dist/flipping.web.js
  • https://unpkg.com/flipping@latest/dist/flipping.gsap.js

Or you can npm install flipping --save and import it into your projects:

// import not necessary when including the unpkg scripts in a <script src="..."> tag
import Flipping from 'flipping/adapters/web'; const flipping = new Flipping(); // First: let Flipping read all initial bounds
flipping.read(); // execute the change that causes any elements to change bounds
doSomething(); // Last, Invert, Play: the flip() method does it all
flipping.flip();

Handling FLIP transitions as a result of a function call is such a common pattern, that the .wrap(fn) method transparently wraps (or “decorates”) the given function by first calling .read(), then getting the return value of the function, then calling .flip(), then returning the return value. This leads to much less code:

const flipping = new Flipping(); const flippingDoSomething = flipping.wrap(doSomething); // anytime this is called, FLIP will animate changed elements
flippingDoSomething();

Here is an example of using flipping.wrap() to easily achieve the shifting letters effect. Click anywhere to see the effect.

See the Pen Flipping Birthstones #Codevember by David Khourshid (@davidkpiano) on CodePen.

Adding Flipping.js to Existing Projects

In another article, we created a simple React gallery app using finite state machines. It works just as expected, but the UI could use some smooth transitions between states to prevent “jumping” and improve the user experience. Let’s add Flipping.js into our React app to accomplish this. (Keep in mind, Flipping.js is framework-agnostic.)

Step 1: Initialize Flipping.js

The Flipping instance will live on the React component itself, so that it’s isolated to only changes that occur within that component. Initialize Flipping.js by setting it up in the componentDidMount lifecycle hook:

 componentDidMount() { const { node } = this; if (!node) return; this.flipping = new Flipping({ parentElement: node }); // initialize flipping with the initial bounds this.flipping.read(); }

By specifying parentElement: node, we’re telling Flipping to only look for elements with a data-flip-key in the rendered App, instead of the entire document.
Then, modify the HTML elements with the data-flip-key attribute (similar to React’s key prop) to identify unique and “shared” elements:

 renderGallery(state) { return ( <section className="ui-items" data-state={state}> {this.state.items.map((item, i) => <img src={item.media.m} className="ui-item" style={{'--i': i}} key={item.link} onClick={() => this.transition({ type: 'SELECT_PHOTO', item })} data-flip-key={item.link} /> )} </section> ); } renderPhoto(state) { if (state !== 'photo') return; return ( <section className="ui-photo-detail" onClick={() => this.transition({ type: 'EXIT_PHOTO' })}> <img src={this.state.photo.media.m} className="ui-photo" data-flip-key={this.state.photo.link} /> </section> ) }

Notice how the img.ui-item and img.ui-photo are represented by data-flip-key={item.link} and data-flip-key={this.state.photo.link} respectively: when the user clicks on an img.ui-item, that item is set to this.state.photo, so the .link values will be equal.

And since they are equal, Flipping will smoothly transition from the img.ui-item thumbnail to the larger img.ui-photo.

Now we need to do two more things:

  1. call this.flipping.read() whenever the component will update
  2. call this.flipping.flip() whenever the component did update

Some of you might have already guessed where these method calls are going to occur: componentWillUpdate and componentDidUpdate, respectively:

 componentWillUpdate() { this.flipping.read(); } componentDidUpdate() { this.flipping.flip(); }

And, just like that, if you’re using a Flipping adapter (such as flipping.web.js or flipping.gsap.js), Flipping will keep track of all elements with a [data-flip-key] and smoothly transition them to their new bounds whenever they change. Here is the final result:

See the Pen FLIPping Gallery App by David Khourshid (@davidkpiano) on CodePen.

If you would rather implement custom animations yourself, you can use flipping.js as a simple event emitter. Read the documentation for more advanced use-cases.

Flipping.js and its adapters handle the shared element and parent-child transitions by default, as well as:

  • interrupted transitions (in adapters)
  • enter/move/leave states
  • plugin support for plugins such as mirror, which allows newly entered elements to “mirror” another element’s movement
  • and more planned in the future!

Resources

Similar libraries include:

  • FlipJS by Paul Lewis himself, which handles simple single-element FLIP transitions
  • React-Flip-Move, a useful React library by Josh Comeau
  • BarbaJS, not necessarily a FLIP library, but one that allows you to add smooth transitions between different URLs, without page jumps.

Further resources:

  • Animating the Unanimatable – Joshua Comeau
  • FLIP your Animations – Paul Lewis
  • Pixels are Expensive – Paul Lewis
  • Improving User Flow Through Page Transitions – Luigi de Rosa
  • Smart Transitions in User Experience Design – Adrian Zumbrunnen
  • What Makes a Good Transition? – Nick Babich
  • Motion Guidelines in Google’s Material Design
  • Shared Element Transition with React Native

Animating Layouts with the FLIP Technique is a post from CSS-Tricks