Quick! What’s the Difference Between Flexbox and Grid?

Let’s go rapid fire and try to answer this question with quick points rather than long explanations. There are a lot of similarities between flexbox and grid, starting with the fact that they are used for layout and much more powerful than any layout technique that came before them. They can stretch and shrink, they can center things, they can re-order things, they can align things… There are plenty of layout situations in which you could use either one to do what we need to do, and plenty of situations where one is more well-suited than the other. Let’s focus on the differences rather than the similarities:


Flexbox can optionally wrap. If we allow a flex container to wrap, they will wrap down onto another row when the flex items fill a row. Where they line up on the next row is independent of what happenned on the first row, allowing for a masonry-like look.

Grid can also optionally wrap (if we allow auto filling) in the sense that items can fill a row and move to the new row (or auto place themselves), but as they do, they will fall along the same grid lines all the other elements do.

Flexbox on top, Grid on bottom

You could think of flexbox as “one dimensional.” While flexbox can make rows and columns in the sense that it allows elements to wrap, there’s no way to declaratively control where elements end up since the elements merely push along a single axis and then wrap or not wrap accordingly. They do as they do, if you will, along a one-dimensional plane and it’s because of that single dimension that we can optionally do things, like align elements along a baseline — which is something grid is unable to do.

.parent { display: flex; flex-flow: row wrap; /* OK elements, go as far as you can on one line, then wrap as you see fit */
}

You could think of grid as “two dimensional in that we can (if we want to) declare the sizing of rows and columns and then explicitly place things into both rows and columns as we choose.

.parent { display: grid; grid-template-columns: 1fr 3fr 1fr; /* Three columns, one three times as wide as the others */ grid-template-rows: 200px auto 100px; /* Three rows, two with explicit widths */ grid-template-areas: "header header header" ". main sidebar" "footer . .";
} /* Now, we can explicitly place items in the defined rows and columns.
*/
.child-1 { grid-area: header;
} .child-2 { grid-area: main;
} .child-3 { grid-area: sidebar;
} .child-4 { grid-area: footer;
}
Flexbox on top, Grid on bottom

I’m not the world’s biggest fan of the “1D” vs. “2D” differentiation of grid vs. flexbox, only because I find most of my day-to-day usage of grid is “1D” and it’s great for that. I wouldn’t want someone to think they have to use flexbox and not grid because grid is only when you need 2D. It is a strong distinction though that 2D layout is possible with grid though in ways it is not in flexbox.


Grid is mostly defined on the parent element. In flexbox, most of the layout (beyond the very basics) happen on the children.

/* The flex children do most of the work
*/
.flexbox { display: flex; > div { &:nth-child(1) { // logo flex: 0 0 100px; } &:nth-child(2) { // search flex: 1; max-width: 500px; } &:nth-child(3) { // avatar flex: 0 0 50px; margin-left: auto; } }
} /* The grid parent does most of the work
*/
.grid { display: grid; grid-template-columns: 1fr auto minmax(100px, 1fr) 1fr; grid-template-rows: 100px repeat(3, auto) 100px; grid-gap: 10px;
}

Grid is better at overlapping. Getting elements to overlap in flexbox requires looking at traditional stuff, like negative margins, transforms, or absolute positioning in order to break out of the flex behavior. With grid, we can place items on overlapping grid lines, or even right within the same exact grid cells.

Flexbox on top, Grid on bottom

Grid is sturdier. While the flexing of flexbox is sometimes its strength, the way a flex item is sized gets rather complicated. It’s a combination of width, min-width, max-width, flex-basis, flex-grow, and flex-shrink, not to mention the content inside and things like white-space, as well as the other items in the same row. Grid has interesting space-occupying features, like fractional units, and the ability for content to break grids, though, generally speaking, we’re setting up grid lines and placing items within them that plop right into place.


Flexbox can push things away. It’s a rather unique feature of flexbox that you can, for example, put margin-right: auto; on an element and, if there is room, that element will push everything else as far away as it can go can.


Here are some of my favorite tweets on the subject:

The post Quick! What’s the Difference Between Flexbox and Grid? appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

Putting the Flexbox Albatross to Real Use

If you hadn’t seen it, Heydon posted a rather clever flexbox layout pattern that, in a sense, mimics what you could do with a container query by forcing an element to stack at a certain container width. I was particularly interested, as I was fighting a little layout situation at the time I saw this and thought it could be a solution. Let’s take a peak.

“Ad Double” Units

I have these little advertising units on the design of this site. I can and do insert them into a variety of places on the site. Sometimes they are in a column like this:

Ad doubles appearing in a column of content

Sometimes I put them in a place that is more like a full-width environment:

Ad doubles going wide.

And sometimes they go in a multi-column layout that is created by a flexible CSS grid.

Ad doubles in a grid layout that changes column numbers at will.

So, really, they could be just about any width.

But there is a point at which I’d like the ads to stack. They don’t work side by side anymore when they get squished in a narrow column, so I’d like to have them go over/under instead of left/right.

I don’t care how wide the screen is, I care about the space these go in

I caught myself writing media queries to make these ads flop from side by side to stacked. I’d “fix” it in one place only to break it in another because that same media query doesn’t work in another context. I needed a damn container query!

This is the beauty of Heydon’s albatross technique. The point at which I want them to break is about 560px, so that’s what I set out to use.

The transition

I was already using flexbox to lay out these Ad Doubles, so the only changes were to make it wrap them, put in the fancy 4-property albatross magic, and adjust the margin handling so that it doesn’t need a media query to reset itself.

This is the entire dif:

Screenshot of a GitHub commit showing the difference between the existing code and the new code using the albatross technique. Seven lines are highlighted in green, indication new code, and 13 lines are highlighted in red, indicating deleted code.

And it works great!

Peeking at it in Firefox DevTools

Victoria Wang recently wrote about designing the Firefox DevTools Flexbox Inspector. I had to pop open Firefox Developer Edition to check it out! It’s pretty cool!

The coolest part, to me, is how it shows you the way an individual flex item arrives at the size it’s being rendered. As we well know, this can get a bit wacky, as lots of things can affect it like flex-basis, flex-grow, flex-shrink, max-width, min-width, etc.

Here’s what the albatross technique shows:

The post Putting the Flexbox Albatross to Real Use appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

Piecing Together Approaches for a CSS Masonry Layout

Masonry layout, on the web, is when items of an uneven size are laid out such that there aren’t uneven gaps. I would guess the term was coined (or at least popularized) for the web by David DeSandro because of his popular Masonry JavaScript library, which has been around since 2010.

JavaScript library. Nothing against JavaScript, but it’s understandable we might not want to lean on it for doing layout. Is there anything we can do in CSS directly these days? Sorta.

Is vertical order with ragged bottoms OK?

If it is, then CSS columns will do just fine.

See the Pen Masonry with Columns by Chris Coyier (@chriscoyier) on CodePen.

Flexbox can do vertical columns with ragged endings too

But it’s not quite as clever, because you’ll need to set a height of some kind to get it to wrap the columns. You’ll also have to be explicit about widths rather than having it decide columns for you.

But it’s doable and it does auto space the gaps if there is room.

See the Pen Masonry with Flexbox by Chris Coyier (@chriscoyier) on CodePen.

Do you need a clean bottom edge? A Flexbox/JavaScript combo can help.

Jamie Perkins originally wrote this, then Janosh Riebesell re-wrote it and, now I’m porting it here.

It totally messes with the order and requires the children to be flexy about their height, but it does the trick:

See the Pen Masonry with Flexbox + JS by Chris Coyier (@chriscoyier) on CodePen.

Is horizontal line masonry OK?

If it’s just the uneven brick-like look you’re after, then horizontal masonry is way easier. You could probably even float stuff if you don’t care about the ragged edge. If you wanna keep it a block… flexbox with allowed flex-grow is the ticket.

See the Pen Masonry with Flexbox + JS by Chris Coyier (@chriscoyier) on CodePen.

You’d think CSS grid could help

CSS grid is very amazing and useful in a CSS developer’s everyday life, but it’s not really designed for masonry style layouts. CSS grid is about defining lines and placing things along those lines, where masonry is about letting elements end where they may, but still exerting some positional influence.

Balázs Sziklai has a nice example of auto-flowing grids that all stack together nicely, with pretty good horiziontal ordering:

See the Pen True Masonry with Grid Layout by Balázs Sziklai (@balazs_sziklai) on CodePen.

But you can see how strict the lines are. There is a way though!

Grid + JavaScript-manipulated row spans

Andy Barefoot wrote up a great guide. The trick is setting up repeating grid rows that are fairly short, letting the elements fall into the grid horizontally as they may, then adjusting their heights to match the grid with some fairly light math to calculate how many rows they should span.

See the Pen CSS Grid Masonry (Step 10) by Andy Barefoot (@andybarefoot) on CodePen.

Rahul Arora went down this road as well:

See the Pen Rahul Arora’s Left-to-right Masonry Layout using CSS Grid by Chris Coyier (@chriscoyier) on CodePen.

DOM-shifted elements in a CSS columns layout

What people generally want is column-stacking (varied heights on elements), but with horizontal ordering. That last grid demo above handles it pretty well, but it’s not the only way.

Jesse Korzan tackled it with CSS columns. It needs JavaScript as well to get it done. In this case, it shifts the elements in the DOM to order them left-to-right while providing a horizontal stack using a CSS columns layout. This introduces a bit of an accessibility problem since the visual order (left-to-right) and source order (top-to-bottom) are super different & dash; though perhaps fixable with programmatic tabindex?

There’s also the original library and variations

Float away, my pretties.

See the Pen Masonry with Masonry by Chris Coyier (@chriscoyier) on CodePen.

And it’s newer, hipper verion: Colcade!

See the Pen Masonry with Colcade by Chase (@chasebank) on CodePen.

And here’s MagicGrid, in which a flexbox layout is lightly manipulated with a JavaScript lib:

See the Pen Magic Grid by Chris Coyier (@chriscoyier) on CodePen.

The post Piecing Together Approaches for a CSS Masonry Layout appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

Use Cases for Flexbox

I remember when I first started to work with flexbox that the world looked like flexible boxes to me. It’s not that I forgot how floats, inline-block, or any other layout mechanisms work, I just found myself reaching for flexbox by default.

Now that grid is here and I find myself working on projects where I can use it freely, I find myself reaching for grid by default for the most part. But it’s not that I forgot how flexbox works or feel that grid supersedes flexbox — it’s just that darn useful. Rachel puts is very well:

Asking whether your design should use Grid or Flexbox is a bit like asking if your design should use font-size or color. You should probably use both, as required. And, no-one is going to come to chase you if you use the wrong one.

Yes, they can both lay out some boxes, but they are different in nature and are designed for different use cases. Wrapping un-even length elements is a big one, but Rachel goes into a bunch of different use cases in this article.

Direct Link to ArticlePermalink

The post Use Cases for Flexbox appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

The peculiar magic of flexbox and auto margins

In front-end development, there are often times when I know that I don’t know something. I might know enough to know what CSS to search for, but I have absolutely no idea how to use it or what the right syntax is. Somehow, in my head, there appears to be a filing cabinet that’s entirely empty, and when I try to look something up, all I find is an almost illegible sticky note instead.

One topic like this (which is an area I’ve sort of always known about but never really understood) is how auto margins and flexbox interact with one another.

Take this example for instance:

.parent { display: flex
} .child { margin: auto;
}

What does this do again? I seem to recall there’s a bunch of nifty things you can do with it, and earlier this week, I half-remembered them after reading a great post by Sam Provenza from a while back that shows how auto-margins and flexbox work together. But I still didn’t quite get the concept even after reading that post, and it wasn’t until I started making demos of my own that it started to click.

In that post, Sam describes how margin: auto impacts flex items like so:

If you apply auto margins to a flex item, that item will automatically extend its specified margin to occupy the extra space in the flex container, depending on the direction in which the auto-margin is applied.

Let’s pick that apart a bit and say we have a simple parent div with a child div inside it:

<div class="parent"> <div class="child"></div>
</div>

And let’s assume we’re using the following CSS to style those divs:

.parent { display: flex; height: 400px; background-color: #222;
} .child { background-color: red; width: 100px; height: 100px;
}

The result is something like this:

See the Pen margin-auto: #1 by Robin Rendle (@robinrendle) on CodePen.

When we add margin-left: auto to the .child element like so:

.child { background-color: red; width: 100px; height: 100px; margin-left: auto;
}

…then we’ll see this instead:

See the Pen margin-auto: #2 by Robin Rendle (@robinrendle) on CodePen.

Weird, huh? The left-hand margin is pushing the parent so that the child is nestled up in the far right-hand corner. But it gets a little weirder when we set all margins to auto:

.child { background-color: red; width: 100px; height: 100px; margin: auto;
}

See the Pen margin-auto: #3 by Robin Rendle (@robinrendle) on CodePen.

It’s like we’re using a popular centering trick by setting justify-content and align-items to center because the child decides to rest in the center of the parent, both horizontally and vertically. Likewise, if we set margin-left and margin-top to auto, then we can let the flex item push itself into the bottom-right of the parent:

See the Pen margin-auto: #4 by Robin Rendle (@robinrendle) on CodePen.

When Sam says, “that item will automatically extend its specified margin to occupy the extra space in the flex container,” the way my empty filing cabinet brain interprets that is like so:

Setting the margin property on a flex child will push the child away from that direction. Set margin-left to auto, the child will push left. Set margin-top to auto and the child will push to the top.

After I write that down, it sounds so obvious to me now that it’s almost foolish but sometimes that’s what it takes to get a new concept to stick in my big dumb spongey noggin.

Why is this useful to know? Well, I think there are a few moments where justify-self or align-self might not get you exactly what you want in a layout where using auto margins gives you that extra flexibility to fine-tune things. A lot of demos I’ve seen out there, including the ones Sam made for her original post, mostly appear to be for aligning navigation items in a menu. So, pushing one item in that menu to the bottom or far right of a flex parent is certainly useful in those scenarios.

Anyway, I think this weird trick is important to remember, just in case.

The post The peculiar magic of flexbox and auto margins appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

Grid to Flex

Una Kravets shows how to make layouts in CSS Grid with flexbox fallbacks for browsers that don’t support those grid properties just yet. Una writes:

CSS grid is AMAZING! However, if you need to support users of IE11 and below, or Edge 15 and below, grid won’t really work as you expect…This site is a solution for you so you can start to progressively enhance without fear!

The site is a provides examples using common layouts and component patterns, including code snippets. For example:

See the Pen Grid To Flex — Example 1 by Una Kravets (@una) on CodePen.

Direct Link to Article — Permalink

The post Grid to Flex appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

A Quick Way to Remember the Difference Between `justify-content` and `align-items`

I was talking with a pal the other day and moaning about flexbox for the millionth time because I had momentarily forgotten the difference between the justify-content and align-items properties.

“How do I center an element horizontally with flex again?” I wondered. Well, that was when she gave me what I think is the best shorthand way of remembering how the two work together.

She said that justify-content positions elements across the horizontal axis because the word itself is longer than align-items. At first I thought this was a really silly idea but now this is how I remember it. I even used it five minutes ago when I needed to make these two quick demos:

See the Pen justify-content: center by Robin Rendle (@robinrendle) on CodePen.

See the Pen align-items: center by Robin Rendle (@robinrendle) on CodePen.

So, to summarize:

  • justify-content: longer word: horizontal alignment
  • align-items: shorter word: vertical alignment

This had me thinking if there are there any other mnemonic devices or ways that to remember complex things in CSS? Are there any other tricks you’d recommend? It sort of reminds me of the way kids are taught to remember the names of planets with things like, “My Very Educated Mother Just Showed Us Nine” where the first letter in each word represents the first letter of each planet: Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune.

The post A Quick Way to Remember the Difference Between `justify-content` and `align-items` appeared first on CSS-Tricks.