The web can be anything we want it to be

I really enjoyed this chat between Bruce Lawson and Mustafa Kurtuldu where they talked about browser support and the health of the web. Bruce expands upon a lot of the thoughts in a post he wrote last year called World Wide Web, Not Wealthy Western Web where he writes:

…across the world, regardless of disposable income, regardless of hardware or network speed, people want to consume the same kinds of goods and services. And if your websites are made for the whole world, not just the wealthy Western world, then the next 4 billion people might consume the stuff that your organization makes.

Another highlight is where Bruce also mentions that, as web developers, we might think that we’ve all moved on from jQuery as a community, and yet there are still millions of websites that depend upon jQuery to function properly. It’s an interesting anecdote and relevant to recent discussions about React making a run at being the next thing to replace jQuery:

However! The most interesting part of this particular discussion, for me at least, is where they talk about Flash and the impact it had on the design of CSS3 and HTML5. They both argue that despite Flash’s shortcomings and accessibility issues, it happened to show us all that the web can be much more than just a place to store some hypertext and that ultimately it can be anything we want it to be.

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Is jQuery still relevant?

Part of Remy Sharp’s argument that jQuery is still relevant is this incredible usage data:

I’ve been playing with BigQuery and querying HTTP Archive’s dataset … I’ve queried the HTTP Archive and included the top 20 [JavaScript libraries] … jQuery accounts for a massive 83% of libraries found on the web sites.

This corroborates other research, like W3Techs:

jQuery is used by 96.2% of all the websites whose JavaScript library we know. This is 73.1% of all websites.

And BuiltWith that shows it at 88.5% of the top 1,000,000 sites they look at.

Even without considering what jQuery does, the amount of people that already know it, and the heaps of resources out there around it, yes, jQuery is still relevant. People haven’t stopped teaching it either. Literally in schools, but also courses like David DeSandro’s Fizzy School. Not to mention we have our own.

While the casual naysayers and average JavaScript trolls are obnoxious for dismissing it out of hand, I can see things from that perspective too. Would I start a greenfield large project with jQuery? No. Is it easy to get into trouble staying with jQuery on a large project too long? Yes. Do I secretly still feel most comfortable knocking out quick code in jQuery? Yes.

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