​Truly understand your site visitors’ behavior

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World wide wrist

After all the hubbub with WWDC over the past couple of days, Ethan Marcotte is excited about the news that the Apple Watch will be able to view web content.

He writes:

If I had to guess, I’d imagine some sort of “reader mode” is coming to the Watch: in other words, when you open a link on your Watch, this minified version of WebKit wouldn’t act like a full browser. Instead of rendering all your scripts, styles, and layout, mini-WebKit would present a stripped-down version of your web page. If that’s the case, then Jen Simmons’s suggestion is spot-on: it just got a lot more important to design from a sensible, small screen-friendly document structure built atop semantic HTML.

But who knows! I could be wrong! Maybe it’s a more capable browser than I’m assuming, and we’ll start talking about best practices for layout, typography, and design on watches.

I had this inkling for a long while that there wouldn’t ever be a browser in the Watch due to its constraints, but instead I hoped that there might be a surge of methods to read web content aloud via some sort of voice interface. “Siri, read me the latest post from James’ blog,” is probably nightmare fuel for most people but I was sort of holding out for devices like this to access the web via audio.

Another interesting aside is that both Safari OSX and iOS have had a reader mode for a long time now, but have it as an option enabled by the user while viewing the content. Bypassing the user-enabled option would be the difference on watchOS and where our structured, semantic chops are put to task.

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Headless CMS: The Developers’ Best Friend

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The web can be anything we want it to be

I really enjoyed this chat between Bruce Lawson and Mustafa Kurtuldu where they talked about browser support and the health of the web. Bruce expands upon a lot of the thoughts in a post he wrote last year called World Wide Web, Not Wealthy Western Web where he writes:

…across the world, regardless of disposable income, regardless of hardware or network speed, people want to consume the same kinds of goods and services. And if your websites are made for the whole world, not just the wealthy Western world, then the next 4 billion people might consume the stuff that your organization makes.

Another highlight is where Bruce also mentions that, as web developers, we might think that we’ve all moved on from jQuery as a community, and yet there are still millions of websites that depend upon jQuery to function properly. It’s an interesting anecdote and relevant to recent discussions about React making a run at being the next thing to replace jQuery:

However! The most interesting part of this particular discussion, for me at least, is where they talk about Flash and the impact it had on the design of CSS3 and HTML5. They both argue that despite Flash’s shortcomings and accessibility issues, it happened to show us all that the web can be much more than just a place to store some hypertext and that ultimately it can be anything we want it to be.

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​Build a realtime polling web app with Next.js

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Developing a design environment

Jules Forrest discusses some of the work that her team at Credit Karma has been up to when it comes to design systems. Jules writes:

…in most engineering organizations, you spend your whole first day setting up your development environment so you can actually ship code. It’s generally pretty tedious and no one likes doing it, but it’s this thing you do to contribute meaningful work to production. Which got me thinking, what would it look like to make it easier for designers to design for production?

That’s what Jules calls a “design environment” and she’s even written a whole bunch of documentation in Thread, Credit Karma’s design system, for designers on their team to get that design environment up and running. That’s stuff like fonts, Sketch plugins, and other useful assets:

These problems have certainly been tackled by other teams in the past but this is the first time I’ve heard the phrase “design environment” before and I sort of love the heck out of it. Oh, and this post reminds me of a piece by Jon Gold where he wrote about Painting with Code.

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Browser Extensions I Actually Use

I use around 10 at the moment and they all provide functionality to me I find extremely important. Sometimes that functionality is every day all day. Sometimes it’s once in a blue moon but when you need it, you need it.

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Service Worker Cookbook

I stumbled upon this site the other day from Mozilla that’s a collection of recipes to get started with a Service Worker — from caching strategies and notifications to providing an offline fallback to your users, this little cookbook has it all.

You can also check out our guide to making a simple site work offline and the offline site that resulted from it.

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​High Performance Hosting with No Billing Surprises

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Unicode Patterns

These Unicode patterns by Yuan Chuan are extraordinarily clever. It’s a <css-doodle> custom web component that sets up a CSS grid and randomizes what character to drop into a cell and things, like color.

See all their gorgeous work on CodePen and the very cool <css-doodle> website as well.

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