Shipping system fonts to GitHub.com

System font stacks got hot about a year ago, no doubt influenced by Mark Otto’s work putting them live on GitHub.

The why, to me, feels like (1) yay performance and (2) the site looks like the rest of the operating system. But to Mark:

Helvetica was created in 1957 when the personal computer was a pipe dream. Arial was created in 1982 and is available on 95% of computers across the web. Millions, if not billions, of web pages currently use this severely dated font stack to serve much younger content to much younger browsers and devices.

As display quality improves, so too must our use of those displays. System fonts like Apple’s San Francisco and Microsoft’s Segoe aim to do just that, taking advantage of retina screens, dynamic kerning, additional font-weights, and improved readability. If operating systems can take advantage of these changes, so too can our CSS.

I also like the team’s idea of adding emoji fonts at the end of the font declaration so that you have the best support possible for those too:

p { font-family: -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, "Segoe UI", Roboto, Oxygen, Ubuntu, Cantarell, "Fira Sans", "Droid Sans", "Helvetica Neue", Arial, sans-serif, "Apple Color Emoji", "Segoe UI Emoji", "Segoe UI Symbol";
}

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Shipping system fonts to GitHub.com is a post from CSS-Tricks

Your Sketch library is not a design system redux

I really like this post by Brad Frost about what is and isn’t a design system, particularly when he de-emphasizes the importance of tools when it comes to that sort of work :

…components living inside static design tools like Sketch isn’t itself a design system. Pardon my clickbait. Perhaps a better title would have been “Your Sketch library is not a(n entire) design system.”

No doubt tools like Sketch are super valuable, and having a set of reusable components inside them helps design teams establish thoughtful and consistent UIs. However, a Sketch library is just one piece of the design system puzzle. A design system also can include other puzzle pieces like:

  • Design principles
  • UX guidelines
  • Development guidelines
  • Coded UI components
  • Component guidelines, usage, and details
  • Page templates
  • User flows
  • Design tools
  • Dev tooling
  • Code repositories
  • Voice and tone guidelines
  • Implementation guides
  • Contribution processes
  • Team structure
  • Resources (internal and external)
  • Other guidelines/resources/tools/process

I’ve been mulling this post over the past couple of days and I’ve started to think of design systems as much more than a suite of tools. In fact, I’m starting to think that folks who work on design systems should start to de-emphasize how important specific tools are and focus much more on the community-building aspects of the work instead.

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Your Sketch library is not a design system redux is a post from CSS-Tricks

Observable

Observable launched a couple of weeks ago. As far as I understand, it’s sort of like a mix between CodePen and Medium where you create “notebooks” for exploring data, making nifty visualizations.

Check out this a note about this interesting new format, founder Mike Bostock describes a notebook as “an interactive, editable document defined by code. It’s a computer program, but one that’s designed to be easier to read and write by humans.”

All of this stuff riffs on a lot of Mike’s previous work which is definitely worth exploring further if you’re a fan of complex visualizations on the web.

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Observable is a post from CSS-Tricks

CSS Grid Layout Module Level 2

The second iteration of CSS Grid is already in the works and the public editor’s draft was released last week! While it is by no means the final W3C recommendation, this draft is the start of discussions around big concepts many of us have been wanting to see since the first level was released, including subgrids:

In some cases it might be necessary for the contents of multiple grid items to align to each other. A grid container that is itself a grid item can defer the definition of its rows and columns to its parent grid container, making it a subgrid. In this case, the grid items of the subgrid participate in sizing the grid of the parent grid container, allowing the contents of both grids to align.

The currently defined characters of subgrid items are particularly interesting because they illustrate the differences between a subgrid and its parent grid. For example:

The subgrid is always stretched in both dimensions in its subgridded dimension(s): the align-self/justify-self properties on it are ignored, as are any specified width/height constraints.

In addition to subgrids, aspect-ratio-controlled gutters and conformance are also defined in the draft and worth a read. It’s great to see so much momentum around grids!

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CSS Grid Layout Module Level 2 is a post from CSS-Tricks

PixelSnap

Forever I’ve used the macOS Command-Shift-4 screenshot utility to measure things. Pressing it gets you a little crosshairs cursor which you can click-and-drag to take a screenshot but, crucially, has little numbers that tell you the width/height of the selection in pixels. It’s crude, but ever so useful.

See those teeny-tiny numbers in the bottom-right? So useful, even if they are tough to read.

PixelSnap is one of those apps that, once you see it, you’re like OMG that’s the best idea ever. It’s the same kind of interaction (key command, then mouse around), but it’s drawing lines between obvious measurement points in any window at all. Plus it has this drag around and area and snap to edges thing that’s just as brilliant. Instant purchase for me.

The Product Hunt newsletter said:

Two teenage makers launched PixelSnap, a powerful design tool to measure every pixel on your screen. Hit #1 on Product Hunt, and over $5,000 in sales within 24 hours of their launch. 📝✨

Hey, even cooler!

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PixelSnap is a post from CSS-Tricks

Wufoo Forms Integrate With Everything

(This is a sponsored post.)

Wufoo helps you build forms you can put on any website. There’s a million reasons you might need to do that, from the humble contact form, to a sales lead generation form, to a sales or registration form.

That’s powerful and useful all by itself. But Wufoo is even more powerful when you consider that it integrates with over 1,000 other web services.

  • Wufoo integrates with over a dozen CRM solutions, including Salesforce, Nutshell, Highrise, Nimble, and more.
  • Wufoo integrates with the most popular email marketing services like MailChimp, Campaign Monitor, Sendloop, and more.
  • Wufoo integrates with payment processors like Stripe, PayPal, Chargify, and more.
  • You can put Wufoo forms on any website, including WordPress sites, Wix sites, Squarespace sites.

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Wufoo Forms Integrate With Everything is a post from CSS-Tricks

Web-Powered Augmented Reality: a Hands-On Tutorial

Uri Shaked has written about his journey in AR on the web from the very early days of Google’s Project Tango to the recent A-Frame experiments from Mozilla. Front-end devs might be interested in A-Frame because of how you work with it – it’s a declarative language like HTML! I particularly like this section where Uri describes how it felt to first play around with AR:

The ability to place virtual objects in the real space, and have them stick in place even when you move around, seemed to me like we were diving down the uncanny valley, where the boundaries between the physical world and the game were beginning to blur. This was the first time I experienced AR without the need for markers or special props — it just worked out of the box, everywhere.

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Web-Powered Augmented Reality: a Hands-On Tutorial is a post from CSS-Tricks

Variable Fonts with Jason Pamental

We’ve already hit you with a one-two punch of variable fonts today. Robin shared Richard Rutter’s post on real-world usage of them. Ollie Williams introduced us to the in’s-and-out’s of using them on the web.

I figured we’d make it a trifecta and link up our discussion about variable fonts with Jason Pamental. Dave and I talk with Jason for an entire hour digging into the real story, possibilities, and future of all this variable fonts business. Don’t miss his or Mandy Michael’s demo Collections either.

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Variable Fonts with Jason Pamental is a post from CSS-Tricks

How to use variable fonts in the real world

Yesterday Richard Rutter posted a great piece that explores how the team at Clearleft built the new Ampersand conference website using variable fonts (that’s the technology that allows us to bundle multiple widths and weights into a single font file). Here’s the really exciting part though:

Two months ago browser support for variable fonts was only 7%, but as of this morning, support was at over 60%. This means font variations is a usable technology right now.

And the nifty thing is that there’s a relatively large number of variable fonts to experiment with, not only in browsers but also in desktop design apps, too:

Variable font capable software is already more pervasive than you might think. For example, the latest versions of Photoshop and Illustrator support them, and if you’re using macOS 10.13+ or iOS 11+ the system font San Francisco uses font variations extensively. That said, the availability of variable fonts for use is extremely limited. At the time of writing there are not really any commercial variable webfonts available, but there is a growing number of free and experimental variable webfonts, as showcased in the Axis Praxis playground.

Adobe also made a bunch of variable fonts available a while back, if you’re looking for more typefaces.

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How to use variable fonts in the real world is a post from CSS-Tricks

Bend any Website’s CSS to Your Will With Stylish or Stylebot

As a self-professed CSS nerd, I take it upon myself to inject my own CSS onto websites when I need to to fix bugs or just fiddle them up to my liking.

This is a post that details how I do that using the Stylish and Stylebot browser extensions.

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Bend any Website’s CSS to Your Will With Stylish or Stylebot is a post from CSS-Tricks