Refactoring Your Way to a Design System

Mina Markham on refactoring a large and complex codebase into an agile design system, slowly over time:

If you’re not lucky enough to be able to start a new design system from scratch, you can start small and work on a single feature or component. With each new project comes a new opportunity to flesh out a new part of the system, and another potential case study to secure buy-in and showcase its value. Make sure to carefully and thoroughly document each new portion of the system as it’s built. After a few projects, you’ll find yourself with a decent start to a design system.

As a side note, Mina’s point here also reminds me of an old blog post called “Things You Should Never Do” by Joel Spolsky where he talks about how all this work and all this code you feel you needs to be refactored is actually solving a problem. Deleting everything and starting from scratch is almost never a good idea:

When you throw away code and start from scratch, you are throwing away all that knowledge. All those collected bug fixes. Years of programming work.

I’m not entirely sure that Joel’s piece about programming fits snuggly with Mina’s point but I think it’s an interesting one to make nonetheless: new code doesn’t necessarily mean that it’s better.

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Refactoring Your Way to a Design System is a post from CSS-Tricks

New in Chrome 63

Yeah, we see browser updates all the time these days and you may have already caught this one. Aside from slick new JavaScript features, there is one new CSS update in Chrome 63 that is easy to overlook but worth calling out:

Chrome 63 now supports the CSS overscroll-behavior property, making it easy to override the browser’s default overflow scroll behavior.

The property is interesting because it natively supports the pull to refresh UI that we often see in native and web apps, defines scrolling regions that are handy for popovers and slide-out menus, and provides a method to control the rubber-banding effect on some touch devices so that a page does a hard stop at the top and bottom of the viewport.

For now, overscroll-behavior is not a W3C standard (here’s the WICG proposed draft). It’s currently only supported by Chrome (63, of course) which also means it’s in Opera (version 50). Chrome Platform Status reports that it is currently in development for Firefox and has public support from Edge.

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New in Chrome 63 is a post from CSS-Tricks

Don’t Use My Grid System (or any others)

This presentation by Miriam at DjangoCon US last summer is not only well done, but an insightful look at the current and future direction of CSS layout tools.

Many of us are familiar with Susy, the roll-your-own Grid system Miriam developed. We published a deep-dive on Susy a few years back to illustrate how easy it makes defining custom grid lines without the same pre-defined measures included in other CSS frameworks, like Foundation or Bootstrap. It really was (and is) a nice tool.

To watch Miriam give a talk that discourages using frameworks—even her very own—is a massive endorsement of more recent CSS developments, like Flexbox and Grid. Her talk feels even more relevant today than it was a few months ago in light of Eric Meyer’s recent post on the declining complexity of CSS.

Yes, today’s CSS toolkit feels more robust and the pace of development seems to have increased in recent years. But with it come new standards that replace the hacks we’ve grown accustomed to and, as a result, our beloved language becomes less complicated and less reliant on dependencies to make it do what we want.

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Don’t Use My Grid System (or any others) is a post from CSS-Tricks

Is jQuery still relevant?

Part of Remy Sharp’s argument that jQuery is still relevant is this incredible usage data:

I’ve been playing with BigQuery and querying HTTP Archive’s dataset … I’ve queried the HTTP Archive and included the top 20 [JavaScript libraries] … jQuery accounts for a massive 83% of libraries found on the web sites.

This corroborates other research, like W3Techs:

jQuery is used by 96.2% of all the websites whose JavaScript library we know. This is 73.1% of all websites.

And BuiltWith that shows it at 88.5% of the top 1,000,000 sites they look at.

Even without considering what jQuery does, the amount of people that already know it, and the heaps of resources out there around it, yes, jQuery is still relevant. People haven’t stopped teaching it either. Literally in schools, but also courses like David DeSandro’s Fizzy School. Not to mention we have our own.

While the casual naysayers and average JavaScript trolls are obnoxious for dismissing it out of hand, I can see things from that perspective too. Would I start a greenfield large project with jQuery? No. Is it easy to get into trouble staying with jQuery on a large project too long? Yes. Do I secretly still feel most comfortable knocking out quick code in jQuery? Yes.

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Is jQuery still relevant? is a post from CSS-Tricks

Evolution of img: Gif without the GIF

Colin Bendell writes about a new and particularly weird addition to Safari Technology Preview in this excellent post about the evolution of animated images on the web. He explains how we can now add an MP4 file directly to the source of an img tag. That would look something like this:

<img src="video.mp4"/>

The idea is that that code would render an image with a looping video inside. As Colin describes, this provides a host of performance benefits:

Animated GIFs are a hack. […] But they have become an awesome tool for cinemagraphs, memes, and creative expression. All of this awesomeness, however, comes at a cost. Animated GIFs are terrible for web performance. They are HUGE in size, impact cellular data bills, require more CPU and memory, cause repaints, and are battery killers. Typically GIFs are 12x larger files than H.264 videos, and take 2x the energy to load and display in a browser. And we’re spending all of those resources on something that doesn’t even look very good – the GIF 256 color limitation often makes GIF files look terrible…

By enabling video content in img tags, Safari Technology Preview is paving the way for awesome Gif-like experiences, without the terrible performance and quality costs associated with GIF files. This functionality will be fantastic for users, developers, designers, and the web. Besides the enormous performance wins that this change enables, it opens up many new use cases that media and ecommerce businesses have been yearning to implement for years. Here’s hoping the other browsers will soon follow.

This seems like a weird hack but, after mulling it over for a second, I get how simple and elegant a solution this is. It also sort of means that other browsers won’t have to support WebP in the future, too.

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Evolution of img: Gif without the GIF is a post from CSS-Tricks

Calendar with CSS Grid

Here’s a nifty post by Jonathan Snook where he walks us through how to make a calendar interface with CSS Grid and there’s a lot of tricks in here that are worth digging into a little bit more, particularly where Jonathan uses grid-auto-flow: dense which will let Grid take the wheels of a design and try to fill up as much of the allotted space as possible.

As I was digging around, I found a post on Grid’s auto-placement algorithm by Ian Yates which kinda fleshes things out more succinctly. Might come in handy.

Oh, and we have an example of a Grid-based calendar in our ongoing collection of CSS Grid starter templates.

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Calendar with CSS Grid is a post from CSS-Tricks

The User Experience of Design Systems

Rune Madsen jotted down his notes from a talk he gave at UX Camp Copenhagen back in May all about design systems and also, well, the potential problems that can arise when building a single unifying system:

When you start a redesign process for a company, it’s very easy to briefly look at all their products (apps, websites, newsletters, etc) and first of all make fun of how bad it all looks, and then design this one single design system for everything. However, once you start diving into why those decisions were made, they often reveal local knowledge that your design system doesn’t solve. I see this so often where a new design system completely ignores for example the difference between platforms because they standardized their components to make mobile and web look the same. Mobile design is just a different thing: Buttons need to be larger, elements should float to the bottom of the screen so they are easier to reach, etc.

This is born from one of Rune’s primary critiques on design systems: that they often benefit the designer over the user. Even if a company’s products aren’t the prettiest of all things, they were created in a way that solved for a need at the time and perhaps we can learn from that rather than assume that standardization is the only way to solve user needs. There’s a difference between standardization and consistency and erring too heavily on the side of standards could have a water-down effect on UX that tosses the baby out with the bath water.

A very good read (and presentation) indeed!

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The User Experience of Design Systems is a post from CSS-Tricks

Slate’s URLs Are Getting a Makeover

Greg Lavallee writes about a project currently underway at Slate, where they’ve defined a new goal for themselves:

Our goal is speed: Readers should be able to get to what they want quickly, writers should be able to swiftly publish their posts, and developers should be able to code with speed.

They’ve already started shipping a lot of neat improvements to the website but the part that really interests me is where they focus on redefining their URLs:

As a web developer and product dabbler, I love URLs. URLs say a tremendous amount about an application’s structure, and their predictability is a testament to the elegance of the systems behind them. A good URL should let you play with it and find delightful new things as you do.

Each little piece of our new URL took a significant amount of planning and effort by the Slate tech team.

The key takeaway? URLs can improve user experience. In the case of Slate, their URL structure contained redundant subdirectory paths, unnecessary bits, and inverted information. The result is something that reads more like a true hierarchy and informs the reader that there may be more goodies to discover earlier in the path.

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Slate’s URLs Are Getting a Makeover is a post from CSS-Tricks

​HelloSign API: Your development time matters

(This is a sponsored post.)

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If you’re a business looking for a way to integrate eSignatures into your website or app, test drive HelloSign API for free today.

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​HelloSign API: Your development time matters is a post from CSS-Tricks

Font of the Month Club

Every month for the past year, David Jonathan Ross has been publishing a new font to his Font of the Month Club. It’s only $6 for a monthly subscription and it provides early access to some of his work. I’d highly recommend signing up because each design is weird and intriguing in a very good way:

Join the Font of the Month Club and get a fresh new font delivered to your inbox every single month! Each font is lovingly designed and produced by me, David Jonathan Ross.

Fonts of the month are not available anywhere else, and will include my distinctive display faces, experimental designs, and exclusive previews of upcoming retail typeface families.

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Font of the Month Club is a post from CSS-Tricks