A Site for Front-End Development Conferences (Built with 11ty on Netlify)

I built a new little site! It’s a site for listing upcoming conferences in the world of front-end web design and development. In years past (like 2017), Sarah Drasner took up this daunting job. We used a form for new conference submissions, but it was still a rather manual task of basically manually editing a blog post. I wanted to keep doing this, as I think it’s valuable to have a simple reference page for conferences in our niche slice of the web, but I wanted the site to be able to live on year after year with lower maintenance-related technical debt.

So this is what I did!

I wanted to get it on GitHub.

So I put it there. Part of the beauty of GitHub is that it opens up the idea of collaboration through pull requests to really anyone in the world. You need to have a GitHub account, but that’s free, and you need to understand Git at least on some minor level (which is a barrier that I’d like to resolve in time), but it invites more collaboration than something like just asking people to email you content and ideas.

I wanted the content in Markdown in the Repo.

The Front Matter format, which is Markdown with some data the the top, is such a useful and approachable format. You need almost zero knowledge, not even HTML, to be able to create/edit a file like this:

Having the actual conference data in the repo means that pull requests aren’t just for design or features; more commonly, they will be for actual conference data. The work of making this site full of all the best conferences is the work of all of us, not just one of us.

At the time of this writing there have already been 30 closed pull requests.

I used 11ty to build the site.

11ty is almost fascinatingly simple. It looks in one directory for what it needs to process or move to another directory. It supports my favorite templating system out of the box: Nunjucks. Plus front matter Markdown like I mentioned above.

I was able to essentially design a card that displays the data we get from the Markdown files, and then build the homepage of the site by looping over those Markdown files and applying the templated card.

11ty is based on Node.js, so while I did have some learning-curve moments, it was comfortable for me to work in. There definitely is configuration for doing the things I wanted to be doing. For example, this is how I had to make a “collection” of conferences in order to loop over them:

config.addCollection("conferences", function(collection) { let allConferences = collection.getFilteredByGlob("site/conferences/*.md"); let futureConferences = allConferences.filter(conf => { return conf.data.date >= new Date(); }); return futureConferences;
});

The site is hosted on Netlify.

One reason to use Netlify here is that it’s incredibly easy. I made a site site in Netlify by connecting it to the GitHub repo. I told it how to build the site (it’s a single command: eleventy) and where the built site files are (dist), and that’s it. In fact, that’s even part of the repo:

Now whenever I push to the master branch (or accept a pull request into master), the site automatically rebuilds and deploys. Just takes seconds. It’s really amazing.

Better, for each pull request, Netlify makes sure everything is in order first:

My favorite is the deploy preview. It gives you an (obscure) URL that will literally last forever (immutable) and that serves as a look at the built version of this site with that pull request.

So, not only is it extremely easy to use Netlify, but I get a bunch of stuff for free, like the fact that the site is smokin’ fast on their CDNs and such.

I’m also excited that I’ve barely tapped into Netlify’s features here, so there is a lot of stuff I can dig into over time. And I intend to!

I use Zapier to re-build the site every day.

There is a bit of a time-sensitive nature to this site. The point of this site is to reference it for upcoming conferences. It’s less interesting to see past conferences (although maybe we can have a browse-able archive in the future). I like the idea of ripping off past conferences for the homepage. If this was PHP (or whatever), we could do that at runtime, but this is a static site (on purpose). Doing something like this at build time is no big deal (see that code snippet above that only returns conferences past today’s date). But we can’t just waiting around for pull requests to re-build the site, nor do I want to make it a manual thing I need to do every day.

Fortunately, this is easy as pie with Zapier:

Phil Hawksworth took this to the extreme once and built a clock website that rebuilds every minute.


This site wasn’t just an experiment. I’d like to keep it going! If you’re part of running a conference, I’m quite sure it doesn’t hurt to add it to add yours, just so long as it has an enforcable and actionable Code of Conduct, and is within the world of front-end web design and development.

The post A Site for Front-End Development Conferences (Built with 11ty on Netlify) appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

Netlify Makes Deployments a Cinch

(This is a sponsored post.)

Let’s say you were going to design the easiest way to deploy a static site you can possibly imagine. If I was tasked with that, I’d say, well, it would deploy whenever I push to my master branch, and I’d tell it what command to run to build my site. Or maybe it has its own CLI where I can kick stuff out with as I choose. Or, you know what, maybe it’s so accommodating, I could drag and drop a folder onto it somehow and it would just deploy.

Good news: Netlify is way ahead of me. Netlify can do all those things, and so much more. Your site will be hosted on a CDN so it’s fast as heck. You can roll back to any other deployment because each build is immutable and trivially easy to point to. You can upload a folder of Node JavaScript functions and you can run those so you can do back-end things, like talk to APIs securely. Heck, even your forms can be automatically processed without writing any code at all!

It’s almost shocking how useful Netlify is. I recommend giving it a try, it might be just that empowering tool you need to build that next project you have in mind. 🤔

Direct Link to ArticlePermalink

The post Netlify Makes Deployments a Cinch appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

Netlify

(This is a sponsored post.)

It’s always fun to watch developers discover Netlify for the first time. It’s so easy. One way to do it is to just literally drag and drop a folder onto them and it will be online. Even better, connect a Git repo to a Netlify site and tell it what branch you want to watch, then any commits to that branch will automatically go live, even running your site’s build as it does it. I heard one developer say, “It’s like someone actually designed hosting and deployment.”

That lends itself nicely to static sites, but don’t think that static sites are only for certain types of sites or limiting in some way. That’s what the JAMstack is all about! Wanna learn more about that? Come to JAMstack_conf!

Netlify does a ton to help you power your JAMstack site as well. They’ll process your forms. They’ll help you with authentication. They’ll do your A/B testing. They’ll even run your cloud functions. Pretty incredible, really.

Direct Link to Article — Permalink

The post Netlify appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

JAMstack Comments

JAMstack sites are often seen as being static. A more accurate mental model for them would be that they are sites which have the ability to be hosted statically. The difference might seem semantic, but thanks to the rise of many tools and services which simplify running a build and deploying to static hosting infrastructure, such sites can feel much fresher and dynamic than you might imagine, while still capable of being served from static hosting infrastructure, with all the benefits that brings.

A feature often used as an example of why a site cannot be hosted statically is comments. A comments engine needs to handle submissions, allow for moderation, and is by its very nature, “dynamic”.

Comment systems are generally thought of as quite dynamic content

Thanks to the growing ecosystem of tools available for JAMstack sites, there are solutions to this. Let’s look at an example which you could use on your own site, which:

  • Does not depend on client-side JavaScript
  • Could work with any static site generator
  • Includes moderation
  • Sends notifications when new comments need moderating
  • Bakes the comments into your site, so that they load quickly and appear in searches

This example makes use of some of the features of Netlify, a platform for automating, deploying and hosting web projects, but many of the principles could be used with other platforms.

You can see the example site here.

Stashing our content

We’ll create 2 forms to receive all of our comments at the different stages of their journey from commenter to content. When Netlify sees a <form>, it creates a unique data store for the data the form collects. We’ll make great use of that.

  • Form 1) A queue to hold all of the new comment submissions. In other words, a store to hold all comments awaiting moderation.
  • Form 2) Contains all approved comments.

The act of moderation will be somebody looking at each new submission and deciding, “yep!” or “nope!”. Those that get nope-d will be deleted from the queue. Those that are approved will be posted over to the approved comments form.

All of the comments in the approved comments form are used by our static site generator in subsequent site builds thanks to the API access Netlify gives to the submissions in our forms.

The comment form

Each page includes an HTML <form>. By adding the boolean attribute of netlify to any HTML form element in your site, Netlify will automatically generate an API for your form, and gathers all of the submissions to it for you. You’ll also be able to access the submissions via that API later. Handy!

The comments <form> on each page will look a lot like this (some classes and extra copy omitted for clarity):

<form netlify name="comments-queue" action="/thanks"> <input name="path" type="hidden" value="{{ page.url }}"> <p> <label for="name">Your name</label> <input type="text" name="name" id="name"> </p> <p> <label for="email">Your email</label> <input type="email" name="email" id="email"> </p> <p> <label for="comment">Your comment</label> <textarea name="comment" id="comment"></textarea> </p> <p> <button type="submit">Post your comment</button> </p>
</form>

You’ll may notice that the form also includes a type="hidden" field to let us know which page on the site this comment is for. Our static site generator populates that for us when the site is generated, and well use it later when deciding which comments should be shown on which page.

Submissions and notifications

When a new comment is posted via the comment form, Netlify not only stashes that for us, but can also send a notification. That could be:

  • an email
  • a Slack notification
  • a webhook of our choosing.

These give us the chance to automate things a little.

New submissions result in a notification being posted to Slack. We’ll get to see what was submitted and to which page right there in our Slack client.

To make things extra slick, we can massage that notification a little to include some action buttons. One button to delete the comment, one to approve it. Approving a new comment from a Slack notification on your phone while riding the bus feels good.

We can’t make those buttons work without running a little bit of logic which, we can do in a Lambda function. Netlify recently added support for Lambda functions too, making the process of writing and deploying Lambdas part of the same deployment process. You’ll not need to go rummaging around in Amazon’s AWS configuration settings.

We’ll use one Lambda function to add some buttons to our Slack notification, and another Lambda function to handle the actions of clicking either of those buttons.

Bring the comments into the site

With a freshly approved comment being posted to our approved comments form, we are back to using the submission event triggers that Netlify provides. Every time something is posted to the approved comments form, we’ll want to include it in the site, so we have Netlify automatically rebuild and deploy our site.

Most static site generators have some notion of data files. Jekyll uses files in a [_data] directory, Hugo has a similar data directory. This example is using Eleventy as its static site generator which has a similar concept. We’ll make use of this.

Each time we run our site build, whether in our local development environment or within Netlify through their automated builds, the first step is to pull all of our external data into local data files which our a Gulp task.

Armed with a `comments.json` file which we have populated from a call to Netlify’s form submission API which grabbed all of our approved comments, our The example site and all of its code are available to explore. You can try submitting comments if you like (although poor old Phil will need to moderate any comments on this example site before they appear, but that will just make him feel loved).

Better still, you can clone this example and deploy your own version to Netlify with just a few clicks. The example site explains how.

Just show me behind the scenes right now!

If you’d want to take a look at how things behave for the moderator of a site using this system without grabbing a copy of your own, this short video will walk through a comment being made, moderated and incorporated into the site.

The post JAMstack Comments appeared first on CSS-Tricks.